101 great youth soccer drills

101 Great Youth Soccer Drills: Great Drills and Skills for Better Fundamental Play
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Filled with energy, these drills are guaranteed to improve your players' skills in such areas as:. Designed for daily use, this handy encyclopedia of drills will be a faithful companion on your journey from Coach Mom or Dad to true soccer expert. You won't want to step on the practice field without it. Robert Koger coached soccer for more than twenty-five years, both in youth recreation and club programs. He lives in Holliday, Texas. Convert currency. Add to Basket. Book Description McGraw-Hill, Condition: New.

More information about this seller Contact this seller. Seller Inventory ZZN. Language: English. Brand new Book. Written by an expert youth-soccer coach with more than twenty-five years of experience on the field, this exhaustive collection provides all the drills you need to bring your players to the next level - and have fun doing it. Whether you're a beginner or an experienced coach, " Great Youth Soccer Drills" will be your helpful assistant at every practice. Filled with energy, these drills are guaranteed to improve your players' skills in such areas as: passing; trapping; heading the ball; shielding the ball from defenders; dribbling and juggling; protecting the goal; shooting to score; mastering their positions; and, much signed for daily use, this handy encyclopedia of drills will be a faithful companion on your journey from coach mom or dad to true soccer expert.

Seller Inventory AAC Book Description Condition: New. Seller Inventory n. Electronic Book Text. Seller Inventory BBS Robert Koger. Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education , This specific ISBN edition is currently not available. View all copies of this ISBN edition:. When you blow the whistle, have them stop the ball, do a somersault, and then get the ball and continue dribbling. This develops. Leapfrog F Put half the team in pairs—two in a row, one in front of the other, about three to five yards apart.

Have those players get on the ground on their hands and knees. Give a ball to players on the other half of the team. Have the players with the ball dribble up to those on the ground, pass the ball past the person on the ground to their left or right, leapfrog jump over the player on the ground, run to the ball that they passed, and continue dribbling toward the next player where they again pass the ball and leapfrog over them. After the players have leapfrogged the other players four or five times, switch the players and repeat. This teaches dribbling and passing and stretches players. Pass Through Goal I Have half of the players stand in a line with their legs apart their legs are a goal , side by side, with about two yards between players goals.

Place a cone five yards in front of and five yards behind each standing player goal. Have the other players start at the cone in front of one of the standing players, dribble up to the player that is standing, and pass the ball through their legs. After the players have shot on goal four or five times, switch the positions of the.

This teaches dribbling, shooting, and ball control and builds cardiovascular endurance. Tag I Line up all of your players and give them each a ball. While that player counts, the others start dribbling wherever they want. The tagger must then run and tag each player as they dribble. Most will dribble slow, or in a small area. Some will go in a straight line and quickly get out of a decent range. This provides cardiovascular endurance and dribbling skills and enables the player doing the tagging to make choices.

You do this by kicking the ball. Kicking with accuracy is necessary in passing and scoring. Note: When kicking the ball toward the goal, do not kick directly to the goalie. Teach this from the beginning. Place two or three cones in the right and left corners of the goal, and have the players shoot at the cones. The players will have a tendency to see the goalie and kick directly to the goalie. The goalie is the danger area, and all kicks must be away from the goalie to the right or to the left. Your body should be balanced over the ball with the knee pointing downward toward the ball. To help your players find their sweet spot, have them sit on the ground with their feet in front of them about 6 to 12 inches out from their body.

They should be sitting comfortably and able to raise their foot, knee, and leg straight up. Then have them hold a ball above their head, drop it straight down toward the laces of their shoe, and raise their foot until it meets the ball. When they hit the sweet spot on their foot, the ball will go back up without any spin or rotation. If they hit the ball too high on the laces, it will spin away from them. If the ball is hit below the sweet spot, it will come back toward them. Hitting to either side of the sweet spot will cause the ball to go right or left away from them.

They should repeat this action until they are able to strike the ball and cause it to go straight up and straight back down without any spin or rotation. Mark this spot on the shoe using chalk or adhesive tape. Do drills using that marked spot on the shoe so the players can get used to hitting on the sweet spot. Do not let players kick with their toe. If the kick is with the toe and happens be kicked perfectly, it will go straight.

If the kick is to the right of center of the toe, the ball will go right; if it is left of center, the ball will be propelled left. Players cannot kick accurately by using the toe. Execution: Place plastic cones around the field at different distances. Tell the players where to start and which cone is number 1, 2, 3, 4, etc.

The players then kick the ball at the cone hole until the cone is hit. Have only one player, per hole, at a time. Concentrate on accuracy. Every time the player kicks the ball counts as one stroke. Players keep their own score, and the person with the lowest score wins. For Under-8 players, if someone scores a hole in one hits the cone on one kick , yell. This drill teaches accuracy, touch on the ball, and distance and is a fun game. Knock Down F Preparation: This drill requires cones and one ball for every two players.

Execution: Place cones in two parallel rows with a player behind each. The players behind one line of cones make up Team A; the players behind the other line of cones are Team B. The distance between the cones can be close or far start close and then increase the distance as. Have Team A kick to the opposite line of cones first and see how many they knock down, and then have Team B kick to their opposite line. Leave the knocked cones down. The team to knock all of the cones down first wins. This teaches accuracy and proper passing techniques.

Through Goal I Preparation: This drill requires cones and one ball for every two players. Execution: Set up two cones as a goal, approximately three feet apart, and have one player stand on each side of the cones, facing the opening of the cones goal. The players then pass the ball to each other by putting it between the cones. Vary the distance of the players to the cones, starting short and increasing the distance as they improve.

This teaches accuracy and also teaches the receiving player to move to the ball. Throw and Kick I Preparation: This drill requires cones and a ball for each player. Have the player throw the ball over her head forward or backward and then run to the ball and shoot on goal. Also, have her throw it between her legs. Having a player throw the ball over her head backward requires her to turn toward the ball and quickly locate the ball, move to the ball, drib-. Through the Legs I Preparation: This drill requires two or three soccer balls and a goal can use cones to mark goal area.

Execution: Have players line up in a straight line, one behind another. Then have one player move out into the field, between you and the goal, with his back to the goal. Have the player turn and then move to the ball and either dribble to the goal and shoot, or shoot on goal using a one touch kick only. You can direct one touch or dribble then kick. This teaches the players to pass, receive, and shoot. Roll and Kick G Preparation: This drill requires two or three balls and a goal can use cones to mark goal area. Give the first two or three players their own ball.

Have the player at the front of the line pass the ball to the coach, who is standing between the line of players and the goal. The coach then deflects passes the ball to the right or left as the player moves to the ball. The player then shoots on goal. You can direct one touch kick only or dribble then kick. Water Balloon F Preparation: This drill requires heavy-gauge balloons one for each player plus a few spares and cones.

Execution: Fill each balloon with water. Place the filled balloons on the ground, and have each player dribble a balloon without breaking it. Set up a start and finish line, using cones, and have the players compete against each other. Emphasize not breaking the balloons. Because the balloons will not roll easily, nor will they go straight, the players have to manage the balloons to get them where they need to go. This teaches the players proper dribbling technique and is fun.

Roll and Lift I This will be very difficult for the Under-6 players, hard for the U-8s, and relatively easy for Us and above. Nevertheless, the kids like this drill, and it does develop great touch on the ball. Regardless of their age, let them try. Preparation: This drill requires a ball for each player. Execution: Have each player place a ball in front of himself close enough to put his foot on the top of the ball.

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Have the player place his foot on top of the ball and then roll the foot backward while keeping contact with the ball. This causes the ball to roll toward the player. The player then quickly places his foot on the ground directly in front of the ball as it rolls toward him. As the ball rolls up on his foot, the player lifts his foot and passes the ball down the field. The player must keep. Let each player keep doing this until he can pass the ball straight.

After this is taught, every time you ask the player to throw you the ball, have him use his feet rather than his hands. Player Turn I Preparation: This drill uses three players and two balls.

Execution: Put one player in the center, and the other two opposite each other, in front of and behind the center player. Have the center player turn her back to the outside person passing the ball. As soon as. This requires the players to pass with both their right and left feet. Rotate players after 25 to 50 passes. This teaches the players to communicate on the field, quickly locate the ball, receive, and pass using both feet.

Weave I Preparation: This uses three players, one ball, and a goal. Execution: Have the three players line up on the centerline or end line with one player in the center and one player on each side. Make sure. The center player 1 passes the ball to the front of the outside person and then runs behind that person, turns, and travels straight down the field. The player receiving the ball 2 dribbles to the center, and when reaching the center, passes to the front of the other outside person 3 , running behind that person, turning, and going straight down the field.

The player that received the ball 3 dribbles to the center and passes to the outside player 1. This continues all the way down the field. When in the area. Make sure the players pass to the feet while leading the player and then go behind the person they passed to. This teaches them to lead their passes, cover the position of the player they passed to, dribble, center, and shoot on goal.

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Wall Pass G Preparation: This uses three or four players two or three on offense and one on defense and one ball. Execution: Give one of the offensive players the ball. Have the defender facing and about five yards in front of the person with the ball. Put the other offensive player two or three yards away on the right- or left-hand side of the defender. The offensive player with the ball will dribble toward the defender but just before reaching him will pass the ball to the other offensive player, who is standing beside the defender. As soon as the player passes the ball, that player will go around the defender on the opposite side of the pass.

The outside offensive player who just received the pass will redirect pass the ball behind the defender. The player who originally passed the ball then receives the pass and continues down the field. To add a challenge, you can add an offensive player on the other side of the defender so the defender will not know where the pass is going to go. This teaches distance judgment, passing, defense, and touch.

This is called receiving the ball. Trapping the ball is stopping the ball. You can receive the ball with your head, chest, thigh, or foot. When you see the ball coming, watch the ball, and move in front of it so you are ready to receive the ball. Meet the ball with your foot, and then withdraw your foot move your foot in the direction the ball was going at contact to stop and retain the ball.

If you stick your foot straight out and strike the ball, it will go away from you. Control the ball on the ground with no bounce or roll away from you. Move dribble to open space and play the ball to an open teammate as soon as possible. No matter where the ball is thrown, the player moves that part of her body back upon contact to allow the ball to end its momentum and drop to a position where it can be played. Make sure the ball drops down and does not bounce out. This teaches receiving with all parts of the body. Throw-Trapping F Preparation: This uses the coach or player , one player to receive the ball, and one ball.

Execution: The coach or person throwing the ball throws the ball in the air to the player or rolls it on the ground. No matter where the ball is thrown, the player moves to the ball and places his foot on the ball to stop trap it. When the ball is thrown in the air, have the player watch the ball very closely and place his foot on the ball just as it touches the ground, before it has a chance to bounce.

This develops timing and coordination and teaches trapping with the feet.

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Kick and Collect I Preparation: This drill requires one ball and all of the players. Execution: Line all of the players on the centerline. The coach kicks the ball into the air or rolls it on the ground. When the ball is kicked, the coach yells out the name of a player to receive the ball. That player moves to the ball and uses whatever proper technique receiving or trapping is required to capture the ball. The player then passes the ball back to the coach. Caution: warn players not to use their head if the ball is kicked high in the air and has not touched the ground first.

This teaches players when to trap, when to receive, and to do so using the proper technique. Execution: This drill is the same as the Kick and Collect, but when the player collects the ball, that player will dribble to the goal and shoot. This allows the players to learn how to shoot on goal. You can introduce. If this is done correctly, it will not hurt the player. Heading can be used to pass the ball to another player or to shoot on goal. When first teaching the players to head the ball, deflate the ball so it is soft.

Also, be prepared to deal with bloodied noses. When the ball is coming, move so you are facing the ball and your body is directly in front of it. Watch the ball all the way in, and continue watching the ball as it strikes your forehead. Keep your eyes open—do not close them or you will get hurt—and watch the ball coming to you and going away from you.

Strike the ball with the upper-front portion of your forehead, not with your temples or the top of your head. Move your head back and then forward to strike the ball; do not just stand still and let the ball hit you. Heading Drills All of these drills emphasize the movement involved in properly heading the ball. The players have to time their head movement with the arrival of the ball. The head must be moving forward as it strikes the ball.

Sitting and Knees F Preparation: This uses two players and one ball. Execution: Have one player sit on the ground with her feet straight out in front of her. Have the other player stand directly in front of her and throw the ball, underhanded, toward her. Make the throw short so the player heading the ball has to move forward to strike the ball. This teaches the player to move into the ball and not to Sitting and Knees let the ball strike her.

Do the same with the player positioned with both knees on the ground. Again throw the ball short so the player has to lunge forward to strike the ball. The player can use her hands to keep herself from hitting the ground. This teaches proper techniques for using the head to direct the ball. Execution: To start, have players hold their own ball in their hands and knock the ball out of their hands by heading the ball.

Do not let them move the ball to their head. They should move their head to the ball. Then set up cones and have the players head the ball to a specific location. This teaches proper heading techniques and accuracy for using the head to redirect the ball. Execution: Using the technique shown in Sitting and Knees, have one player throw the ball directly to the other player not short.

Have that player use the same head and body movement to head pass the ball back to the person that threw the ball. Make sure the person heading the ball moves his head back and is going forward when he strikes the ball. This teaches proper techniques for using the head to redirect the ball. Execution: Place all three people in a triangle formation. Have the player that is going to head the ball facing the other two, with each of the other two slightly to the right and left of the player heading the ball. Have one person throw the ball, and have the header redirect it to the person who did not throw the ball.

This will require the header to turn both her head and body to redirect the ball the feet may not have to be moved. Make sure the header leans backward and strikes the ball while going forward. Alternate between the two throwers. After 15 to 25 headers, rotate the players. This teaches the players to properly head the ball and redirect it with accuracy.

Preparation: This requires numerous balls, two lines of players, a goal, and a goalkeeper. Execution: Split the players into two groups, lined up on each side of the goal. Give one group the balls. The first member of this group then. One player from the other side moves forward and heads the ball toward the goal. The goalkeeper tries to stop the ball from entering the goal. This teaches touch on the ball, teaches the players to run to the ball while adjusting to the location, and teaches them to head while on the move. Execution: The player heading the ball should face the person throwing the ball.

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The other players will stand to the right and left sides of the player heading the ball and facing toward that person. The thrower should throw the ball and have the player head the ball directly to one of the players on the right or left. This further amplifies the movement of the body and develops the timing to redirect the ball at a degree angle. Heading on Goal G Preparation: This uses a goalie, a coach, and the team players. Execution: With the goalie in the goal area, have a player start running toward the goal.

Throw the ball into the air, and have the player adjust to the location of the throw by going to the ball. The approaching player then uses her head to direct the ball into the goal but away from the goalie. This is another good time to teach the players that the goalie is the danger area. She will be able to see the goalie and knows the goalie can grab the ball, so it is important that she direct the ball to the right or left of the goalie. Learning to place the ball away from the goalie is important.

Skills and Drills for Better Fundamental Play

Great Youth Soccer Drills: Skills and Drills for Better Fundamental Play [ Robert Koger] on ykoketomel.ml *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Great. Bring out the very best in your young players with these effective and fun soccer drills. Drills are essential. The groundwork of every great play, they hone.

Be sure the ball is thrown at a distance far enough away from the goal to give the goalie a chance to play the ball. This teaches actual game heading, direction, and timing and allows the goalie to move and field catch or knock away live balls. When you shoot, do it quickly; do not hesitate or broadcast the shot. Shoot the ball away from the goalie. Put your weight into the kick and follow through with your leg.

Watch where you kicked the ball and move in the direction of the kick in anticipation of getting another shot. Note: Do not let your players kick with their toe. If the kick is with the toe and happens be kicked directly in the center, it will go straight. If the kick is to the right of center of the toe, the soccer ball will go right. If left of center, the ball will be propelled left. Execution: Place five cones in a straight line across the outer line of the penalty box directly facing the goal to indicate where the balls are to be placed.

Facing the goal, if the players are kicking with their right foot, the balls should be on the left side of the cones. If using the left foot, the balls should be on the right side of the cones. Have Team A kicking and Team B gathering the balls to replace them. Place the balls so the player has to take a few steps in between kicks. Have each player on Team A, one at a time, kick all five balls toward the goal without stopping in between the kicks. Each ball that makes it into the goal is a point.

After Team B is finished, start over again with Team A using the opposite foot. The team scoring the most points is the winner. This teaches players to shoot on the move, develops a sense of goal location, requires them to shoot quickly, and teaches use of both feet. Execution: The difference is the placement of the balls.

They go from one corner of the penalty box to the other. This requires the players to shoot at different angles and maintain their movement longer. Place nine cones across the entire outside line of the penalty box to indicate where the balls are to be placed. Have each player on Team A, one at a time, kick all nine balls toward the goal without stopping in between the kicks. Each ball that is within the left and right posts of the goal is a point.

Have the goalie field the balls. This teaches players to shoot on the move, develops a sense of goal location, requires players to shoot quickly, teaches the use of both feet, and gives the goalie field practice. Sit and Shoot I Preparation: This uses one ball, one defensive player, the rest of the team, a goal, and a goalkeeper.

Execution: Have all of the players sit on the ground. Throw or roll the ball to a player, and have that player jump up, gain control of the ball, and shoot as quickly as he can. You can also place a defender between the sitting players and the goalie and place the goalie in the goal to field the ball.

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As the ball rolls up on his foot, the player lifts his foot and passes the ball down the field. Blow the whistle to start play. This teaches distance judgment, passing, defense, and touch. The best way to practice kicking is by placing the soccer ball in a large plastic bag and having the player hold onto the top of the bag so the ball cannot come out of the bag. From here, have them close their eyes while you begin running away from them. Have the other player throw the ball underhanded to the goalie.

This teaches the players to shoot under any circumstances. Roll Ball I Preparation: This requires numerous balls, a goalie, a goal, and the team. Execution: Create four even groups of players. Place two of the groups, one on each side of the goal, standing by the goalpost. These players take the balls with them.

Place the other two groups on the field, facing the goal and even with the goalposts. Have the front player that is in the right-side group on the field start running toward the goal. Have the front player that is in the group on the opposite side of the goalpost from the approaching player kick the ball toward the advancing player. That player shoots the ball into or toward the goal. Then have the other side do the same thing. Players retrieve the ball if they miss the goal and move in a counterclockwise position, assuming all four positions on the field.

Keep the rotation moving at a fast pace. This teaches players to use whatever foot is appropriate, shoot on the run, and place the ball. The goalie receives field practice. Pass and Shoot I Preparation: This requires two players, a ball, a goalie, and possibly a defender. Execution: Place two players, one with the ball, on the centerline facing the goal. Have the players move toward the goal by passing the ball back and forth between them. As they approach the goal, they shoot away from the goalie.

This can be changed to a game-level situation by putting in a defender and requiring the players to time their passes to get a shot on goal. This reinforces dribbling, passing, and goal techniques and teaches shot timing. Side-Ball Shoot I Preparation: This requires a goalie, the entire team, two people coach and assistant to pass the balls, numerous balls, and cones for the goal.

Execution: Split the players into two groups. Line up one group so they are facing the right side of the goal and the other group facing the left side of the goal. Put the goalkeeper in the goal area. Position someone on each side of the players coach and assistant halfway between the players and the goal. Have a player from either side start moving toward the goal. Pass the ball to the player and have her shoot on goal. If she is coming from the left-hand side, the pass is from the right-hand side, and the player uses her left foot to kick on goal.

Emphasize to the players that they need to shoot behind the goalkeeper. When the player from the right-hand side moves forward, pass from the left side, and have the player shoot with her right foot. Make sure your players switch lines each time. Some will want to stay in the same line so they can always kick with the foot they are the most comfortable with. Make them shoot with both feet. This drill teaches the players to judge the ball coming from the side, shoot at a point in the goal, and use both of their feet.

Over-the-Head One vs. One G Preparation: This requires a goalie, a defender, a thrower, and the rest of the team taking turns at the offensive role. Execution: Have the offensive player turn with her back to the goal. Place the goalie and defender near the goal. At that time both the offensive and defensive players move to the ball. The offensive player should turn and go directly to the ball and make whatever moves are necessary to get around the defensive player to shoot. Quite often, the defensive player will win.

As the players become more proficient, the offensive player will get off more shots. Remind players that they need to shoot when they get any opportunity, not wait for a perfect shot. After the shot or takeaway, the offensive player then becomes defender and the previous defensive player gets back in line to become offense. This allows all players to play offense and defense and teaches shot timing, dribbling, and evasive actions.

The goalie gets good field practice that is directly game related. Quick Shot G Preparation: This requires two teams, two goalkeepers, cones to split the field into three areas, and one ball. Execution: Set up the field so it is divided into thirds. Make the center area bigger than the two end areas. The center area is for dribbling and passing only. Each player can touch the ball only two times while in the center area. After two touches, players must pass to get rid of the ball.

They can then receive the ball back, but only two touches at a time. When the ball goes into the end areas, it must be shot. The ball cannot be dribbled or passed. The end area size can be adjusted for the size of the players. The younger and smaller the players, the shorter the end areas should be. This teaches the players to pass quickly, pass to an open area for shooting, and shoot quickly. Shielding is used as an interim step only until you can move away from the defender or pass the ball to another teammate.

Keep your head up and look for another person on your team to pass to, or dribble away from the opponent. Keep the ball close to yourself so you can maintain control. Position your body between the ball and the opponent. Expect to be pushed by your opponent or be knocked off the ball. This is normal; keep your cool, and play on. Execution: Have the player roll the ball by moving her foot over the top of the ball in the direction she wants the ball to go.

The foot touches the ball gently and moves from back to front, front to back, right to left, or left to right depending on the direction the ball is to be moved. The player can move in circles, back and forth, or any direction. The player can also use her heel or toe.

This teaches touch and ball control. Donkey Tail I Preparation: This uses cones, the entire team, one ball for each player, and enough old socks for each player to have one. Execution: Using numerous cones, mark off an area that is large enough for all of the players to fit into but without a lot of excess room. Have all players put a sock in the back of their soccer shorts, hanging down like a tail. Players should not pull their shirt over the tail sock , and they should position the sock so more than just a few inches of the sock sticks out.

Put all of the players inside the area marked by the cones, and blow the whistle to start play. Each player has to dribble his own. If a player loses control of his ball and it goes out of the markedoff area, he must step outside the cones and wait until the next game to participate again. Each player that has his tail pulled must also step outside the cones. Have the players drop the tails on the ground when they remove one from another player. You will get down to just a couple of players who are left with their tails.

As you get fewer and fewer players, you may want to decrease the size of the cone area. You can stop the drill when two players are left on the field. With just two players, it can go on forever. This teaches the players to shield and control the ball and to be aware of what is happening around them. Execution: Have the player with the ball continuously dribble and shield the ball while the defender tries to capture the ball. Change sides when the ball is captured by the defender. This teaches the offensive player to dribble and shield while the defensive player learns to capture the ball.

Add additional players, and have two trying to get the ball away while two try to maintain control. This teaches the offensive players to get open, to pass, and to keep their head up to see the whole field. It teaches the defense to have patience, get the ball, and guard players to make interceptions. Overall, this drill teaches shielding and offense, defense, passing, and dribbling. Karaoke F Preparation: This drill requires each player to have her own ball. Execution: This drill covers just about everything you want a soccer player to do.

It may be difficult for the players to do at first, but it will become easier as it is repeated. Walk players through the routine prior to actual practice. They should begin by placing the ball even with and outside of their right foot; their weight should be on their right leg and foot. Then have them swing their left foot forward so that it goes behind the right leg and strike the ball with the instep of their left foot.

The right foot should remain planted, or still, until the ball is hit with the left foot. As the ball rolls away, players move to the ball. Then they should hit the ball with the right foot: With the ball even with and outside of their left foot and their weight on the left leg and foot, they swing their right foot forward so it goes behind the left leg and strikes the ball with the instep of their right foot.

The left foot should remain planted, or still, until the ball is hit with the right foot. This is great for teaching agility, balance, touch, and movement of the ball. The ball must stay close to your feet so you can maintain control. It is very important to not continuously watch the soccer ball. You must keep your head up so you can see the field and your teammates.

When dribbling, keep the ball as close to your feet as possible. Do not kick the ball and run to it. Dribble with your head up. Do not focus on the ball. When approaching your opponent, watch her hips and feet plant. This will tell you which direction to go. Also, if the player has one foot in front of the other, then dribble to the side of the advanced foot. Again, the person must reposition to catch up with you. Use fake movements—leaning right and going left, for example. Vary your speed; keep your opponent off balance by slowing, speeding up, and cutting right and left.

Dribble away from your opponent; make her chase you. Always move to open space. Look for another team member who is open so you can pass as quickly as possible. Execution: Have one person start dribbling, and have all of the other players follow the person in front of them, staying in a single file. Home Base F Preparation: This uses cones and the whole team. Execution: Set up cones all over the field, and have players dribble to wherever they want.

Only one player can move to each cone. This teaches the players to dribble, observe players around them, and make decisions. Execution: Have one person dribble while the other two try to take away the ball. Whoever gets the ball then dribbles while the other two try to get the ball. This teaches ball handling and vision. Hand in Air I Preparation: This uses the whole team, each with a ball. Execution: Have the players all dribble.

The coach will hold one arm in the air with his hand holding up a number of fingers. Do not let the players stop dribbling to see the number. This teaches the players to dribble while keeping their head up and watching something other than the ball or their feet. Through the Cones F Preparation: This uses the whole team, each player with a ball, and eight to ten cones. Execution: Set up the cones in a straight row or staggered, and have the players dribble through them.

Place the cones so the players have to move the ball in a straight line and also turn the ball. This can be done. This teaches the players to dribble, control the ball, and vary speed. Each player has to dribble his own ball and maintain control while trying to pull the tail off of another player. Each player that has his tail pulled must also step out-. Moving Goal G Preparation: This requires three players and one ball.

Execution: Set up two people as offense and one as defense. Have the person with the ball dribble away from the defender while the other offensive player moves around the field and tries to get into a position that is open for a pass. When the player dribbling the ball has an opening, the player passes the ball to the other offensive player. That player must position herself so that the ball passes between her feet.

Hence, her legs are the goal. The defensive player tries to stop the pass or take the ball away from the offensive players. This teaches offense and defense, ball control, dribbling, moving to the open, staying aware of the other players, shooting to the feet of your teammate during a pass, and receiving the ball by aligning with the pass. Three Goal G This drill incorporates every skill and is perhaps the best drill to teach dribbling and passing. Preparation: This drill uses the entire team broken into A and B teams , one ball, and six cones. Execution: Place the cones into three sets of two, each put in a triangle placement with about 10 to 20 yards between the pairs and about three feet between the two cones serving as the goals.

Place the cones far enough apart so there is plenty of room to move and play soccer. The players can move anywhere on the field but cannot stand directly in front of any goal to block it. To start play, throw the ball in the air and let each team fight to get possession. Each team then moves the ball by dribbling, passing, etc. However, after the ball passes through the goal, it must be touched first by one of their own teammates before it counts as a point.

After each goal, restart play by throwing the ball into the air. To vary this drill, you can assign goalies to each team and let them use their hands, or you can make a rule that each player can touch the ball only one, two, or three times after the initial receipt. This drill incorporates every action a player uses in a game and teaches players to work together.

It is a method to teach control and touch on the ball and have fun while doing it. Drop the ball onto your foot or thigh or head , and then pop the ball back into the air. Keep the ball moving up and down without using your hands. When you are juggling the ball with your feet, thighs, or head, keep the ball at a constant level low while watching the ball closely. Do not hit it really hard and high into the air. You can use your feet, thighs just above the knee , or head to bounce the ball. Set a goal of so many strikes, and try to reach it. Be sure to use your feet, thighs, and head.

It is easier to use the knee, but the players need to use everything to control and juggle the ball. Note: Start by having the players drop the ball to their feet or thighs and return it to their hands one touch at a time. This enables them to develop touch and control on the ball. It can be practiced by individuals at home. Execution: Blow your whistle to have each player start to juggle the ball.

No player can use the same areas foot, thigh, or head two times straight. The player who juggles the longest using feet, head, and thighs is the winner. Some players will be able to do this easily, while it will be more difficult for others. This teaches ball control. Team Juggling F Preparation: This uses all of the players on the team broken into A and B teams with one ball for each group. Execution: Form the players into a circle with about three to five feet in between players.

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Place one person in the center of the group. Start play by throwing the ball to the center player. The center player kicks or heads directs the ball to one of the players in the circle. The player receiving the ball can move the ball to anyone. The team tries to keep the ball in play without allowing the ball to touch the ground. Two kicks is good to start but will increase as the team continues to do this drill. This drill is good when you Figure This teaches control and teamwork. Soccer Volleyball I This is a drill I used as a reward for the players.

101 Great Youth Soccer Drills: Great Drills and Skills for Better Fundamental Play

We would go to the park and play volleyball using our feet and heads. A crowd normally gathered to watch the play. Preparation: This requires two teams A and B , one ball, and a tennis court or volleyball court with a net. Execution: Place each team on opposite sides of the net.

Have one player serve the ball over the net using his hands to drop the ball to his feet for the serve to the opposing team. Each player can strike the ball only once and can use everything except the hands. The game is identical to volleyball but uses a soccer ball and the players use their soccer. This is a fun activity that allows your players to learn and relax at the same time.

You can also add a goalie on each side who can use his hands to strike the ball. This teaches control, direction, and teamwork. Proper throwing of the soccer ball can be a real advantage to a team by allowing the team to maintain possession of the ball. Some players will see a throw-in where the player runs forward, places the ball on the ground with her arms straight out, tumbles over to her feet, and throws the ball.

This is done to get better distance. Never let your players do this. They can easily injure their necks or backs. Also, the goal of a throw-in is to get the ball to your own teammate. It is impossible to be accurate when doing the flip-type throw-in. Moves like that should be done only in gymnastics. Rules are very simple on throw-ins. Both feet must be on the ground when the ball is thrown, the hands must be directly over the head, and the ball must be thrown straight with equal pressure on each side cannot spin right or left.

A perfectly thrown ball spins forward, directly to the player. To throw, place one hand on each side of the ball, just back of center. Looking at your hands, the thumbs and index fingers will form a letter W. Bring the ball back so it is over and behind your head. Throw the ball onto the field, to your teammate, making sure the ball does not twist to the right or left.

The ball can also be directed back to the player that threw the ball. If you are going to do this, throw the ball and then step into the field of play to receive or kick the ball. Note: Referees will call a bad throw and give the ball to the opposing team if the player throwing the ball throws it over one side or the other of her head. The ball must come directly over the top of the head. Execution: Place the players in two parallel lines facing each other. Give the players on one side the balls.

Have those players throw the balls to the players opposite them on the field. Then have those players return. Walk up and down the field in between the players, observing their throws and making corrections as required. As the players develop, increase the distance between the lines. This teaches the basic throw-in. Throw and Return F Preparation: This requires two players and one ball.

Execution: Have the players face each other. Have one player throw the ball to the other player. Then have that player return the ball. Start with them trying to get the ball to each other with just three bounces, then two, then one. To make this intermediate level, have the players throw to the chest, head, or feet. To make it a game-level situation, place a defender between the two offensive players. This teaches the proper technique and the accuracy needed for throw-ins. Execution: Place one person near the touchline with the ball. Place the other five players at different positions around the field.

Have the player behind the touchline throw the ball to each, working on accuracy. After the player throws to each a few times, have another player do the throwing. Depending upon how many players you have, you can change the numbers so all of your players are involved at the same time.

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You can set up two or more groups and walk through and observe them while they are doing the drill. To make a game situation, use five play-. This makes the players on the field move to get open and trains the player throwing to watch and make quick decisions on where to throw. Overall, this drill teaches accuracy, proper technique, and decision making.

A half volley is the same type of kick, but after the ball has bounced. When the volley is done correctly, the ball will travel forward with topspin top to bottom and will curve down as it travels. When it hits the ground, it will shoot forward with the spin. If it hits an uneven area it can move right or left. Volleys are simple to do, and they are very effective. To do a volley, one foot must be planted on the ground. The upper portion of your other leg is in the air, perpendicular with your body, and the lower portion of your leg is pointing toward the ground.

Your kicking foot must be pointing down with your ankle locked. As the ball approaches, bring the lower half of your leg back and strike the ball sharply. Do not follow through on the kick; this will cause the ball to go into the air. Just quickly strike the ball and bring your leg back. Execution: Have two players stand facing each other.

Have one player throw the ball to the other player, on a bounce. As the ball bounces and starts coming down, have the second player move to be centered on the ball and tap it with his foot using the volley technique. At this time, technique is more important than power. Have the player do this 10 times, and then switch players so the person who was throwing is now kicking. This teaches the proper way to volley the ball. As the ball starts coming down, have the second player move to be centered on the ball and tap it with her foot using the volley technique.

Again, power is not important; technique. This teaches the proper way to center on the ball and then volley the ball accurately. Volley on Goal I Preparation: This drill uses all of the players, two balls, a goalkeeper, and a goal. Execution: Put the players in two lines. You and an assistant throw the balls to the players at the front of the lines on a bounce.