Ceremonial Magic & The Power of Evocation

Weiser Antiquarian
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pdwowza.vidgyor.com/conocer-los-corindones.php After the ritual, I was in another coherent ball of orange light had formed on the floor. A room, making notes, w h e n I looked u p , and saw in the ball of light, not a spot of light. I could see it from all angles hallway, what appeared to be a large smear of white paint but the back, and believe me I looked. It rose slowly into hanging in mid-air. Once again, this was in broad daylight. A second after I saw it, it turned the corner into a room. I, Boom. Just like that. I don't remember if I got what I asked of course followed it, but nothing was there.

This is the for—and it may w e l l be that I didn't ask for anything, only closest thing to classic ectoplasm that I have ever seen. In any case, that was not only Finally, there is the common occurrence of poltergeist the first visible manifestation that I produced in a ritual, phenomena accompanying such experiments. A p a r t from but probably only the second evocation that I attempted.

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This, and no door. Things—large, heavy things—tend to break I thought, w o u l d leave me w i t h the entirety of the rent for of their o w n accord. Once, after an extensive w o r k i n g in the remainder of the lease on the apartment. Consulting the Santeria system, D r. Hyatt and I experienced some yet a different grimoire, I created a talisman to prevent her very o d d peripheral stuff.

He awakened one night, hearing from getting another job and then leaving. The creation of voices and movement in the l i v i n g room of his home. He the talisman i n v o l v e d the evocation of the arch-demon went out, gun in hand, and found nothing. I, also experi- Beelzebub and the extensive repetition of the spell. In fact, enced something similar, and not long after we received since I considered myself in rather desperate straits, I re- many thousands of dollars in totally unexpected funds for peated it whenever she was gone, and placed the talisman our joint Falcon work.

Soon after, I had dinner w i t h h i m. O v e r almost two Just before leaving, I used the toilet. The next morning, I months she repeatedly failed to get jobs she was qualified was informed of a small disaster after I left. They heard a for. In fact, k n o w i n g of my interest in magic, she once l o u d concussion from the restroom and, u p o n checking, asked me if I had cast a spell on her. In any event, I even- discovered that the toilet tank had exploded. So, w i t h all of this said, Ceremonial Magic is the best, The success in material terms of the w o r k i n g aside, a clearest, book on the subject that I have read, and y o u curious thing happened sometime d u r i n g the first week.

I don't have to worry about "blinds.

Jason Black robes standing in the corner of my room. T his book y o u now h o l d in your hands is like no other in the darkly compelling realm of magic k n o w n as "Evocation to Physical Manifestation. To accom- plish this, I have given it a unique structural arrangement and content, as y o u w i l l soon see. This is meant to guide the earnest Practitioner in a way that is not n e w in and of itself.

But this particular presentation is new p r i n c i p a l l y because of the content, magical discussions, axioms, i n - structions, commentaries and annotations contained in its pages. As far as I am aware, they are not given in any other text on the subject, and they w i l l truly lead the earnest student of our A r t and Science to successfully experience one of the ultimate aims of magic: the evocation of a spiri- tual entity in this case, demonic to physical manifestation. W h i l e this text is targeted to the advanced Practitioner, those relatively new to magic and w h o have done some earnest preliminary study and basic ritual w o r k w i l l most certainly benefit from it as w e l l.

A r m - c h a i r critics and self-proclaimed authorities of M e d i e v a l and Renaissance Magic in general, and of this book in particular, w i l l assuredly describe this w o r k i n g manual as being one of those magical 'recipe' books so readily found on today's N e w A g e mass market: " D o A and B " w i t h the promise of getting result " C.

Simply put, y o u will get results. By diligently applying the counsel. Ceremonial Magic 27 given, and carefully integrating it into your personal magical system in the way recommended, y o u will behold one of the material benedictions that w i l l somehow f o l l o w not far most fascinating, terrifying, spiritually exalting, and very behind the exalted spiritual treasure! To be sure, they have possibly materially gratifying realms that magic has to their reasons for doing this.

It never ceases to amaze me to see even the most expe- A l t h o u g h m u c h has been w r i t t e n about ceremonial rienced student of magic accept this dichotomy and strug- magic in general and of the evocation of spirit entities in gle o n , attempting to a p p l y those spiritual forces, whose particular over the past eight h u n d r e d years, all of those very nature is to bestow material gain and power, to some original texts or Grimoires Grammars of Magic combined nebulous, undefined, quasi-spiritual end, w h i l e secretly do not equal the smallest fraction of the n e w books that h o p i n g this spiritual benediction w i l l turn into the hard have appeared on this subject over the last forty years.

As core physical reality he or she needs. W h y does the ardent one w h o began studying and practicing magic all those student persist in this bizarre pastime? If truth be k n o w n , years ago, I not only saw the confusion, frustration and it is because the student does not really believe magic disappointment so many of the n e w l y emerging books on works, at least, not to fulfill material aims.

By consciously accepting and w o r k i n g and disappointment myself. It upheld by the grammars, they are right—it just can't work! Either it is s i m p l y a reprint of hard-core magical practice that w i l l enable y o u to succeed one of the Grimoires w i t h a modern commentary added in evocation, but an eclectic and very effective philosophy usually by some author of this-or-that magical current , or that can be used to b u i l d your own system of general it is a piecemeal presentation of original grimoiric material magic, just like a l l of those successful magicians out in terms of someone's o w n personal system of magic, there—both k n o w n and unknown—have forged for them- w h i c h the aspirant is to follow b l i n d l y and practice reli- selves, and w h i c h some even write about.

Systems that giously if he or she is to experience the results the author's work for them. A n d n o w you can d o the same w i t h this methods promise. We'll also address this problem of belief in magic as w e l l , and show y o u that y o u already possess more than As Regardie pointed out, such attempts by i n d i v i d u a l enough belief to succeed.

Y o u just have to redirect it so it authors or a particular magical order or group are simply can do the most good. It is very important that y o u understand my exact That august writer or magical g r o u p then s o l e m n l y usage of the w o r d grimoire. As the term is typically used, promises the desirous student of Magical A r t that he or she it refers to one of the M e d i e v a l or Renaissance texts that w i l l have their f i l l of spiritual treasures.

This is the exact deal solely w i t h the summoning or calling forth of an intel- opposite of what the original G r i m o i r e states! Such a text ligent, disembodied entity generally referred to as a spirit. In fact, it is your responsibility Secret Grimoire of Turiel, the Grand Grimoire, and the Sixth as a human being to be the best y o u can be, eventually dis- and Seventh Book of Moses. A l l are examples of typical covering what your 'True W i l l ' is as is exhaustively treated Grammars of Magic.

Despite their authors' mate, or any of the m y r i a d of other physical pleasures that long-winded Christian stance and admonitions—a socially w i l l allow y o u to progress spiritually and attain full devel- proper and politically correct carry-over from the days of opment. Throughout my forty years of magical involve- church punishment if the grammar fell into the hands of ment, I have all too often seen such scenes of h u m a n trag- an Inquisition tribunal—such texts have their practical use.

They solemnly a v o w that if the Practitioner or tion if you w i l l , w i t h many but not all of the modern Operator simply holds fast in obedience to their holy writ, books on the subject. They preach salvation through spiri- and d u r i n g the Operation the Operators f i n d w i t h i n them- tual attainment in a diseased host whose life conditions selves the fortitude to face and command the spirits w h e n mandate that at best they struggle for their daily bread. While not explicitly stated in the grammar, the The magical propositions and axioms presented in this implication is that the fulfillment w i l l occur in the twin- book w i l l allow y o u to develop your own magical system k l i n g of an eye.

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In other words, in a very short period of of personal development in a holistic way; attaining spiri- time. Rest assured, it most certainly w i l l , if the above tual development as both a cause and an effect of having conditions of evocation are fulfilled. A case in point is the used your latent d i v i n i t y to satisfy those material needs now popular Goetia, though a terribly misunderstood, mis- and wants that are now blocking your f u l l concentration.

Y o u can and must sweep away those m i l l i o n minutia that are consuming your daily life. Y o u may w e l l ask, " W e l l , what about the really good It was necessary to take the time to explain these finer books out there today that deal w i t h evocation, different points to y o u and to answer your inner arguments against systems, and currents of magic? I'm confused! Y o u seem to what y o u have read thus far. Throughout the years I have be saying they are based u p o n someone's personal system seen these same concerns arise in the minds of all students of magic that works for them only, and that even the cur- of our A r t and Science.

They may seem theoretical to y o u rent grammars can't be relied u p o n because they talk one now. Y o u w i l l come to realize just h o w pragmatic they are w a y or another about spiritual rewards and power first, as you progress through these pages. A r e y o u against all of them? This is the oldest, most useable, most mis- Certainly not. The fact is they are as I described them, understood and neglected document of its k i n d , despite and y o u , the reader, k n o w this.

They have their place in the utter s i m p l i c i t y of its philosophy and use. Taken together, y o u have all y o u need to become w h o y o u already are, and achieve that w h i c h y o u so deeply desire. Chapter Two Throughout this presentation y o u w i l l f i n d I make ref- erence to various other books. In each case, I highly recom- mend y o u obtain them while they are still in print.

No one book can do it all as y o u are aware, and w i t h those appear- History of the Grimoires for the Practitioner ing in the Suggested Reading List p r o v i d e d at the back of. H this book, y o u w i l l have a w o r k i n g research resource at istory is not the static study of events frozen in your disposal that w i l l take y o u far d o w n the Path. It is a dynamic mental exercise in learning the A final w o r d before concluding this chapter. Y o u w i l l cause-effect relationships of forces that have notice that I use repetition freely throughout this volume.

Without an under- It is done intentionally. There is no more fundamental key standing of these forces, regardless of the historical subject to successful learning than repetition. But the typical pro- being investigated, there can be no concrete grasp of the cess of repetition we were all taught, going back and re- overall state of that subject, or of the underlying intricacies reading the material, is not the most effective use of this that provide the intellectual shape needed to productively process. Rather, the most effective type of repetition is that direct and use those forces. Typically, the mental effort required to cepts together.

This is what I have done here, I have em- understand the underlying background of any subject is, ployed the latter two modes of recapitulation to impress by and large, labeled as wasted time. If y o u actually w o r k people w i l l , every once in a while, watch some historical from this book, y o u ' l l thank me for it! U s u a l l y however, this is w h e n they have nothing better to do. In today's society, people try to make time only for those matters that fill some specific need, and that, quickly.

This is understandable to a certain degree w h e n it comes to routine, daily life concerns. But there could be no greater single mistake in learning and effectively a p p l y i n g hidden, occult techniques of magic such as are presented in this book. By understanding the basic cause-effect relationships that motivated the w r i t i n g of the grimoires, a n d the forces of h u m a n need that refined them, y o u w i l l be in a m u c h better position to understand and intelligently interpret. Ceremonial Magic 33 not only the grammars of the past, but the more contempo- rary broad-based magical texts as w e l l.

These are the rea- forces that m o l d structure itself, and shape the patterns sons for this brief historical rendition. These are the same essential ingredients Y o u w i l l learn where the grimoires came from, h o w needed to understand the history of any subject, magic they were originally composed, the pertinent religious and included: structure and causation. In understanding the social factors that influenced their creation and content, structure and causation behind the history of magic, y o u and h o w the summoning of these spirits evolved over the find two powerful tools needed to understand magic itself.

Yes, that's right, over a Once y o u have these tools, your intuitive faculties w i l l period of approximately two-plus m i l l e n n i u m. Indeed, it automatically teach y o u h o w to use them effectively in might surprise y o u to f i n d out that the ancient Egyptians your daily and special magical workings, so that y o u pro- had rituals designed for a type of evocation that w o u l d not ceed w i t h confidence in your secret work.

By gaining a In synthesizing my o w n personal magical system glimpse into such historical perspectives, y o u w i l l come to throughout the past four decades, I applied the above rea- understand the foundation of magic in general through its soning and ideas of structure and causation to it as w e l l. I structure. In turn, this foundation w i l l serve as a spiritual soon found it helpful to divide the history and practice of platform u p o n w h i c h y o u can b u i l d a magical edifice that magic in general, and of Ceremonial and Ritual Magic in becomes your o w n personal system of magic.

One that particular which encompasses Evocation , into seven dis- works for you, and works consistently. The reason for these divisions is that Thus, you w o u l d do w e l l not to pass this chapter up or they introduce further structure into the problem. Once we rush through it in order to get to the meat material. If y o u have structure, we can look for patterns. Patterns lead to a do, that same meat w i l l turn rancid very q u i c k l y , and deeper understanding of the subject.

This understanding thrust y o u head-long into a physically, mentally, emotion- then becomes a tool w h i c h the intuitive faculties begin to ally, and spiritually sickening experience. The direct through the performance of the actual ceremonial or intelligent forces underlying all genuine currents of magic ritual action. In turn, the intuitively-based ritual action are as real as any of the forces that operate our physical confers a confidence w h i c h is reflected back to the Practi- universe. They have nothing whatsoever to do w i t h your tioner in the real-world results obtained from the magical beliefs, at least, not as y o u probably understand it at this workings.

Jump off any roof and y o u w i l l quickly come to plore the basis of magic intelligently. In the same way, if y o u toy or dabble w i t h the forces of magic, you w i l l quickly gain a hard apprecia- The seven Systems of Magic are: tion of their reality as w e l l.

Hermetic Era Magic 2. Dark Ages Era Magic As a physicist, I am deeply concerned w i t h structure and causation in my scientific research. Because 3. Medieval Era Magic structure provides a framework for seemingly discon- 4. Renaissance Era Magic nected bits of data, much like the frame of a picture puzzle 5. Transition Era Magic provides glimpses of the scene being w o r k on. It also gives 6. Gothic Revival Era Magic insight into patterns that are not easily seen; h i d d e n clues 7.

M o d e r n Era Magic as to the physical forces behind the phenomena being studied.

Ceremonial Magic 35 We w i l l take each in turn and investigate the forces i n v o l v e d in shaping magic in general, a n d evocation in g l y p h reveals several different connections of Paths be- particular. This immediately suggests other forces or spirit-interac- 1. Hermetic Era Magic— B. It is mentioned in Flowers' book for all those w h o Papyrus ofAbaris, the magic given in the p a p y r i is the first seriously consider experimenting w i t h Hermetic M a g i c.

A rigorous magical spells and formulae derived directly from original analysis of D r. Flowers' book reveals that the resulting Graeco-Egyptian papyri. As such, it is an invaluable work- Graeco-Egyptian eclectic system still retained significant book for the Practitioner of magic today, even though it traces of its original component parts; keys used to extend was meant primarily to influence scholars w o r k i n g in the this magical system into yet other magical systems over field of the history of religions.

N o t only are the ritual actions found in the Graeco- The hard and cold fact is that the magical currents of Egyptian system strongly reflected in the later six magical today that append the w o r d Hermetic to their name are, systems cited above, but their patterns of thought and for the most part, woefully lacking any substantial basis of p h i l o s o p h y are more or less imaged in these latter day Hermeticism. The reason for this is the magical formulas schools of magic. Flowers illustrates this point perfectly in his con- of the 19th century, required extensive examination by struction a n d interpretation of a H e l l e n i s t i c " C o s m o - authorities in the field over the last eight or nine decades graphic Tree.

Hebrew Qabalistic g l y p h of the Tree of Life so w e l l k n o w Hence their Flermetic influence on the developing magical in today's magical community, and u p o n w h i c h many of systems of the time were minimal at best. Yet this par- ticular g l y p h has its origins in Neo-Platonic Cosmology. In terms of the G o l d e n D a w n material, this is men- tioned by the brilliant esoteric scholar, R. Gilbert, in his L i k e its H e b r e w counterpart w h i c h was used as a i n t r o d u c t i o n to the important w o r k Collectanea template to construct it, it too has ten spheres of pure or Hermetica.

In this single volume of ten papers, compiled "Intelligible" qualities, and 22 Paths or "Sensible" projec- from a series of classic alchemical, Gnostic, and other tions of those qualities into the w o r l d of m i n d and matter. Westcott, the co- Like the Western Qabalah w h i c h is based u p o n the original founder of the Hermetic Order of the G o l d e n D a w n , Hebrew Kabbalah, this pagan g l y p h has Path attributions Gilbert writes of one of these papers: " S i m i l a r l y we can, and connections between its ten spheres or "Sephiroths. Ceremonial Magic 37 There was nothing at all then available to the general pub- lic on Gnostic Magic, and little enough of any value on the The magic of the original p a p y r i is, arguably, com- Egyptian Book of the Dead.

Yet Farr's paper, and the other nine of the Collectanea, This is extremely important to remember because it is from laid d o w n the intellectual basis for that system of magic, as this point onward that we find the beginnings of the syn- Gilbert goes on to explain. Surely Westcott, a medical doc- thesis of Hermetic Magic—that body of work w h i c h w o u l d tor, scholar, and thorough researcher, was aware of the covertly inspire and serve as base material for the other six discovery of the Graeco-Egyptian p a p y r i.

He must also systems. As early as the 7th century B. But this influence d i d not escalate u n t i l B. E , when Alexander the Great conquered this magically-based This comes through in s t u d y i n g Westcott's several country. It was from that time f o r w a r d that E g y p t i a n Prefaces to different sections of the Hermetica.

In them, one thought, theology, and philosophy provided the raw mate- gets the feeling of hesitancy in his writings; that he sus- rial for the Greeks, w h o then applied their logic and ana- pected the incompleteness of the Collectanea because of this lytical rigor to create the magic we call Hermetic today. In missing material. Yet he had the courage to intimate this fact, an examination of early Greek writings w i l l show that shortcoming in the very documents that served as the Greek philosophers credited the Egyptians for m u c h of intellectual underpinnings of the magical order he created.

In F r o m ritual construction to the names of the G o d s and fact, the papyri manuscripts that serve as the foundation their hermetic pronunciation, many are either skewed, and structure of Hermetic Magic is actually dated from contain errors to varying degrees, or are s i m p l y incorrect. The question remains.

What forces were brought to bear upon the Egyptians and their magic An example of h o w Hermetic M a g i c influenced the that eventually produced the synthesis we call Hermetic? For example, the earlier flourishing civilizations of the Babylon, Persian, Syria and Phoenicia used various devices in their formal public religious ceremonies, and in their 1 Westcott, William Wynn Collectanea Hermetica Parts i n d i v i d u a l private devotional practices. Introduction by R.

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Ceremonial Magic 39 in what we term the Magic of Invocation. But the first use of such instruments in a cohesive, balanced, and personal sis of the ancient theory, theology, and philosophy of the ritualistic manner that is defined by a complex, ordered rituals w i t h i n the life of the contemporary magician. This approach to a god or demon, became clearly integrated can only be accomplished through experiencing the rituals and refined only in the Hermetic Tradition.

Such items as in actual practice. In this ing, d i d not arise until the Greek influence of logic, analyt- case, a Hermetic System of Magic, as strange and as differ- ical and mathematical thought blended w i t h E g y p t i a n ent f r o m the Hebraic-based Western System we have M a g i c. W h e n this synthesis was achieved, these instru- today, as can possibly be imagined. In keeping w i t h such a ments became the active components through w h i c h the desire, to those individuals w h o decide to study the under- magician impressed his W i l l and desire u p o n the universe, l y i n g theory and theology of this system of magic, and always in keeping w i t h the philosophy and theology of w h o w i s h to practice it, I highly recommend the books by Hermetic Tradition that also arose through this synthesis.

Flowers and Betz cited earlier and detailed in the Sug- gested Reading List. Those w h o do so, w i l l f i n d that Her- It is true that the earliest Egyptian magicians d i d use metic Magic is magic in its purest and finest form.

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Dark Ages Era Magic— C. But not even here d i d the thoughtful, intelligent Most academic sources include the Dark Ages as a part design of ritual and ceremonial actions take place until the of the M e d i e v a l or M i d d l e Ages era, and cite the time-line Graeco-Egyptian p a p y r i manuscripts came into being for this period as being between C. Others through the Greek effort. A n d while the magical weapons narrow the era of the Dark Ages between C. For our purposes, I have adopted the latter conven- are the simplest of a l l , they are in no w a y to be confused tion.

W i t h the fall of Rome, civilization as the w o r l d knew w i t h the simplicity of tools used in the earth religions.

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So even if y o u were one of the chosen, your life den text his Abbot or Bishop ordered h i m to copy, w h i l e was by all standards, only a couple of cuts above the peas- another copied sections of other tracts he was commis- ants that labored in your church every Sunday for the sioned by his superior to adorn w i t h the latest approved i n s p i r a t i o n and succor they needed to somehow inch church art deco. This grimoire may be the earliest grammar of a lished w i t h the fall of Rome. Mind Magick. As early as the 7th century B. He also preferred the use of the m a n y of the Wicca people nor w i t h the O T O , w h i c h f u l l Qabalistic theory in an evocation, once again, as Regardie supported, nonetheless, out of his commitment to C r o w l e y gave in the Goetia. It was d u r i n g the later years of this era, the A g e of the But it was the efforts made d u r i n g this era—from to Industrial Revolution, , that Western society as a —that gave them the basis for translation and con- whole eventually responded in such a w a y.

The it ended. Roman law and justice, enforced through its m i l i - theory underlying the rituals of this Hermetic Current, and tary might, came to a sudden and abrupt end. Its art, political Ceremonial M a g i c rituals in our contemporary Western structure, philosophy, and education in the classics, ceased System of M a g i c do.

Raiders from U n l i k e some of the pop, convenient, instant gratifica- the north—the N o r t h m e n — b u r n e d , raped and pillaged tion so-called rituals of some elements of the M o d e r n Era hamlets, villages, and towns at w i l l. There was no protec- M a g i c that we f i n d ourselves in today, this o r i g i n a l tive force to stop them.

Hermetic M a g i c does not demand a slavish repetition of ancient rituals. Rather, just as it d i d fifteen hundred to two There is a prayer from this era of the D a r k Ages that thousand years ago w h e n Hermetic M a g i c was being sums up very w e l l the desperation of the people of that forged by the Greeks, this unusual form of magic even time. Ceremonial Magic 41 i n l a n d villages, destroying, k i l l i n g , and stealing as they pleased. Life shifted from the cities to r u r a l areas, as the your life.

The complex, highly successful societal structure seat of government and the orderly regulation of the daily of R o m a n civilization was thus greatly s i m p l i f i e d. They affairs of life faded away. Y o u were n o w a single element in that pathetic body time of personal contraction. At best, life was a horrible they termed the faithful, or w i l l i n g slave if y o u prefer. Y o u daily struggle.

To live from sunrise to sunset and see the were not fit to understand and interpret the Bible, if in- return of the sun again was a feat that required all of one's deed, y o u were fortunate enough to have been taught to resources: mental and physical, for the spiritual sun had read by someone w h o h a d learned from another, and if set along w i t h the Roman one. It was in the shadows of y o u h a d a copy of that rare document of salvation. O n l y this nightmare w o r l d that, not coincidentally, Christianity the priests, those ordained by H o l y Mother C h u r c h and the arose and entrenched itself firmly in the i n d i v i d u a l psyche 'true' representatives of Christ on earth, could do this.

A n d for the next fifteen hundred years. Ironically, the meteoric so y o u obeyed. W h i l e wrestling entered the only common organization of the church that w i t h the earth to grow enough food if y o u were l u c k y provided a substantial measure of physical protection and enough to have a hovel in the forest and access to a small sustenance. This w o u l d be the monastery, where y o u piece of land, or doing menial w o r k for those a little better became a Brother.

There, y o u were taught to read and off than y o u , there w o u l d be death and destruction con- write, but only such approved works as the Gospels and stantly p u l l i n g at your ragged clothing from every side. Is writings of the early saints. After awhile, y o u came to learn it any wonder that your attention moved away from l i v i n g from the hushed whisperings of older Brothers, of the a long and happy life in this w o r l d , to the acceptance of a collections of heretical works kept under lock and key by creed that promised y o u eternal joy around the throne of the H e a d Abbot in massive reserves in forbidden areas of G o d if y o u sought salvation and only salvation while in the monastery.

Such horrific manuscripts presented the details of Of course such salvation could only be obtained by R o m a n law and justice, pagan literature, damnable art complete and b l i n d acceptance of the Christian church in treasures that portrayed the naked h u m a n b o d y , and yes, its entirety. Its dogma and doctrine replaced all dreams even those disgusting writings of the Greeks that dared to and aspirations.

Attendance and participation in its first teach the principles of logic, mathematics, and the work- creation, the synthetic ritual called "The Celebration of the ings of the h u m a n m i n d and soul, all of w h i c h portrayed M a s s , " was an absolute, mandatory requirement. The the w o r l d around y o u as something w o r t h studying and m i n i m u m participation demanded at least once a week understanding, in an attempt to provide some control over attendance to the Sunday Sabbath; more often, if y o u r it. A l l were there, but only for the eyes of h i g h ranking, wretched life condition permitted it.

They were not for y o u. They The new authority of your w o r l d of the l i v i n g d e a d — could study them in order to teach y o u what was best for the Priests—became the keepers of the keys to the Gates of you. Ceremonial Magic 43 But the early church took this continually e v o l v i n g hierarchal structure much further.

Even if y o u were excep- speculate here, as there are no records to confirm or deny tional and were later 'educated' as a priest, yet y o u were this. But based u p o n the scenario given above, m u c h of allowed only those approved works determined by s o m e w h i c h has been documented in historical tracts of the Dark one in the next tier above y o u.

Whether y o u had a tiny, Ages and the Christian church of the time, it is reasonable to think it was only a small leap for discontented clerics of poorly constructed church in the m i d d l e of some forest every garb and station to realize that the basis of their o w n that y o u r peasant faithful w o r s h i p e d i n , or if y o u were religion surely must offer the means and ways to the better called to f u l f i l l the duties of a scribbler, as the term of the life the higher ups in their o w n church were enjoying on a day was used to denote a scribe, your life was severely daily basis.

Power, prestige, love, fame, all were there for limited. This church structure was purposely designed by the higher ups in the church, both to maintain their political Gradually, over the first few centuries, bits and pieces positions of power and their offices, in order to pass them of the few Hermetic texts available leaked out. A trusted d o w n to their sons, as was the tradition of the early scribbler here and there made an extra copy of the forbid- church.

So even if y o u were one of the chosen, your life den text his Abbot or Bishop ordered h i m to copy, w h i l e was by all standards, only a couple of cuts above the peas- another copied sections of other tracts he was commis- ants that labored in your church every Sunday for the sioned by his superior to adorn w i t h the latest approved i n s p i r a t i o n and succor they needed to somehow inch church art deco.

Slowly but surely, by couriered letters and through yet another week of ' l i v i n g. That this scenario is accurate is whether y o u administered the W o r d of G o d or were one of based on the private letters that have survived to this day, those administered to—your only relief and w a y of escape and w h i c h are still contained in such repositories as the was that w h i c h still terrifies all men and w o m e n today: the Bibliotheque de l ' A r s e n a l in Paris, and in the British cold and silence of the grave.

Imagine being born into such Museum. Put m i l d l y , discontent was everywhere. Members of But as we also k n o w , the great bulk of genuine, origi- the church were not exempt from the natural, h u m a n nal Hermetic texts were sealed away in the secret cloisters longings to have and be more in this life; to accomplish of Hermetic magicians in the Mediterranean, only to be feats of wonder in any field of h u m a n endeavor, and be discovered centuries later by Western archeologists and remembered for their w o r k after l i v i n g l o n g , healthy, then exported to Western Europe in the early years of the happy, and prosperous lives in the here and now.

To the first decade of the 19th century, a historical perspective average peasant, this was impossible of course. But to a mentioned in a number of scholarly w o r k s , i n c l u d i n g member of the clergy w i t h a moderate or even rudimen- Fragment of a Graeco-Egyptian Work Upon Magic, produced tary education, the good life was not an impossibility. Nevertheless, the Hermetic influence spread by those Books of Roman and Greek origin, also reputed to be few manuscripts and excerpts of early discontented clerics Hermetic in nature, yielding power and prize to those w h o and genuine church scholars of the day, a n d it had an c o u l d study them and w o r k their wonders.

I can only impact on the developing Christian church and the church fathers. Think not? Read the 4th century C. There y o u w i l l find direct quotes from o w n were abolished and forbidden under p a i n of damna- hermetic texts of the day. A n d yet his treatise was a schol- tion. You will learn where the grimoires came from, how they were originally composed, the pertinent religious and social factors that influenced their creation and content, and how the summoning of these spirits evolved over the past twenty-three hundred years. Yes, that's right, over a period of approximately two-plus millennium.

Indeed, it might surprise you to find out that the ancient Egyptians had rituals designed for a type of evocation that would not be recognized as such by today's standards. By gaining a glimpse into such historical perspectives, you will come to understand the foundation of magic in general through its structure. In turn, this foundation will serve as a spiritual platform upon which you can build a magical edifice that becomes your own personal system of magic. One that works for you, and works consistently. Thus, you would do well not to pass this chapter up or rush through it in order to get to the meat material.

If you do, that same meat will turn rancid very quickly, and thrust you head-long into a physically, mentally, emotion- ally, and spiritually sickening experience. The intelligent forces underlying all genuine currents of magic are as real as any of the forces that operate our physical universe. They have nothing whatsoever to do with your beliefs, at least, not as you probably understand it at this moment. Jump off any roof and you will quickly come to an appreciation, understanding, and experience of the force of gravity. In the same way, if you toy or dabble with the forces of magic, you will quickly gain a hard apprecia- tion of their reality as well.

As a physicist, I am deeply concerned with structure and causation in my scientific research. Because structure provides a framework for seemingly discon- nected bits of data, much like the frame of a picture puzzle provides glimpses of the scene being work on. It also gives insight into patterns that are not easily seen; hidden clues as to the physical forces behind the phenomena being studied. Causation allows for an understanding of the Ceremonial Magic 33 forces that mold structure itself, and shape the patterns being studied. These are the same essential ingredients needed to understand the history of any subject, magic included: structure and causation.

In understanding the structure and causation behind the history of magic, you find two powerful tools needed to understand magic itself. Once you have these tools, your intuitive faculties will automatically teach you how to use them effectively in your daily and special magical workings, so that you pro- ceed with confidence in your secret work. In synthesizing my own personal magical system throughout the past four decades, I applied the above rea- soning and ideas of structure and causation to it as well.

I soon found it helpful to divide the history and practice of magic in general, and of Ceremonial and Ritual Magic in particular which encompasses Evocation , into seven dis- tinct systems or currents, each of which has a fairly clear historical timeline. The reason for these divisions is that they introduce further structure into the problem. Once we have structure, we can look for patterns. Patterns lead to a deeper understanding of the subject. This understanding then becomes a tool which the intuitive faculties begin to direct through the performance of the actual ceremonial or ritual action.

In turn, the intuitively-based ritual action confers a confidence which is reflected back to the Practi- tioner in the real-world results obtained from the magical workings. With these concepts in mind, we can now ex- plore the basis of magic intelligently. The seven Systems of Magic are: 1. Hermetic Era Magic 2. Dark Ages Era Magic 3. Medieval Era Magic 4. Renaissance Era Magic 5. Transition Era Magic 6. Gothic Revival Era Magic 7.

Modern Era Magic 34 Joseph C. We will take each in turn and investigate the forces involved in shaping magic in general, and evocation in particular. Hermetic Era Magic— B. Hermetic Magic encompasses a complete system of theoretical, theological, philosophical, and practical magic. If magic can be said to truly have a starting point or an origin in the classical sense of the word, then it lies here; in the original magic derived from Graeco-Egyptian sources. As Dr. Stephen Edred Flowers points out in his landmark contribution.

Hermetic Magic— The Postmodern Magical Papyrus ofAbaris, the magic given in the papyri is the first known attempt to merge the then varied forms of magical traditions from many different Mediterranean and Eastern countries into one integrated system of magic. A rigorous analysis of Dr. Flowers' book reveals that the resulting Graeco-Egyptian eclectic system still retained significant traces of its original component parts; keys used to extend this magical system into yet other magical systems over time.

Not only are the ritual actions found in the Graeco- Egyptian system strongly reflected in the later six magical systems cited above, but their patterns of thought and philosophy are more or less imaged in these latter day schools of magic. Flowers illustrates this point perfectly in his con- struction and interpretation of a Hellenistic "Cosmo- graphic Tree.

Yet this par- ticular glyph has its origins in Neo-Platonic Cosmology. Like its Hebrew counterpart which was used as a template to construct it, it too has ten spheres of pure or "Intelligible" qualities, and 22 Paths or "Sensible" projec- tions of those qualities into the world of mind and matter. Like the Western Qabalah which is based upon the original Hebrew Kabbalah, this pagan glyph has Path attributions and connections between its ten spheres or "Sephiroths.

This immediately suggests other forces or spirit-interac- tions, thereby possibly extending the range of the Qabalis- tic Tree of Life into new ritual and ceremonial construc- tions beyond what is known today even in the most con- temporary magical societies. This is a very scholarly work in the purest sense of the word, being an in-depth presentation of a large number of magical spells and formulae derived directly from original Graeco-Egyptian papyri.

As such, it is an invaluable work- book for the Practitioner of magic today, even though it was meant primarily to influence scholars working in the field of the history of religions. The hard and cold fact is that the magical currents of today that append the word Hermetic to their name are, for the most part, woefully lacking any substantial basis of Hermeticism. The reason for this is the magical formulas and spells given in the papyri, which were not discovered and imported into Western Europe until the earliest years of the 19th century, required extensive examination by authorities in the field over the last eight or nine decades before they yielded their fruit, as Flowers points out.

Hence their Flermetic influence on the developing magical systems of the time were minimal at best. In terms of the Golden Dawn material, this is men- tioned by the brilliant esoteric scholar, R. Gilbert, in his introduction to the important work Collectanea Hermetica. In this single volume of ten papers, compiled from a series of classic alchemical. Gnostic, and other related texts by none other than W. Westcott, the co- founder of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, Gilbert writes of one of these papers: "Similarly we can, with hindsight, see the weaknesses of Florence Farr's Egyptian Magic, but in it was a pioneering study.

There was nothing at all then available to the general pub- lic on Gnostic Magic, and little enough of any value on the Egyptian Book of the Dead. Surely Westcott, a medical doc- tor, scholar, and thorough researcher, was aware of the discovery of the Graeco-Egyptian papyri. Fie must also have been aware that this discovery was less than a hun- dred years old at the time of the formation of the Golden Dawn, and realized that their content would require gen- erations for translation and study.

This comes through in studying Westcott's several Prefaces to different sections of the Hermetica. In them, one gets the feeling of hesitancy in his writings; that he sus- pected the incompleteness of the Collectanea because of this missing material. Yet he had the courage to intimate this shortcoming in the very documents that served as the intellectual underpinnings of the magical order he created. But his caution, as with his famous foundational tome, was and still remains largely ignored, when one examines a number of the ritual and ceremonial documents of the Golden Dawn or any other current society that bears the word Hermetic in its name.

From ritual construction to the names of the Gods and their hermetic pronunciation, many are either skewed, contain errors to varying degrees, or are simply incorrect. It only takes the most casual study of Flowers' and Betz's texts to see this clearly. The question remains. What forces were brought to bear upon the Egyptians and their magic that eventually produced the synthesis we call Hermetic?

Remember, this is a system of magic which would indi- rectly influence the creation and development of the other six different systems of magic previously listed. Collectanea Hermetica Parts Introduction by R. Samuel Weiser, Inc. Ceremonial Magic 37 The magic of the original papyri is, arguably, com- pletely Egyptian in composition, content, and structure. This is extremely important to remember because it is from this point onward that we find the beginnings of the syn- thesis of Hermetic Magic — that body of work which would covertly inspire and serve as base material for the other six systems.

As early as the 7th century B. But this influence did not escalate until B. E, when Alexander the Great conquered this magically-based country. It was from that time forward that Egyptian thought, theology, and philosophy provided the raw mate- rial for the Greeks, who then applied their logic and ana- lytical rigor to create the magic we call Hermetic today. In fact, an examination of early Greek writings will show that Greek philosophers credited the Egyptians for much of their own magic, theology, and philosophy, and this influ- ence can be found within the writings of Plotinus, Por- phyry, Pythagoras, and Ptolemy.

Over the ensuing centuries, the magical papyri that resulted from this synthesis of Egyptian Magic with Greek self discipline and analytical thinking were produced. In fact, the papyri manuscripts that serve as the foundation and structure of Hermetic Magic is actually dated from circa C. An example of how Hermetic Magic influenced the development of these other systems can be seen when we look at the use of magical "tools.

For example, the earlier flourishing civilizations of the Babylon, Persian, Syria and Phoenicia used various devices in their formal public religious ceremonies, and in their individual private devotional practices. The concepts behind their use, and the manner in which they used them, contain such strong elements that we would designate them today as ritual instruments used 38 Joseph C.

But the first use of such instruments in a cohesive, balanced, and personal ritualistic manner that is defined by a complex, ordered approach to a god or demon, became clearly integrated and refined only in the Hermetic Tradition. Such items as the lamp, altar, incense, robe, ring, and even the circle, combined with words of power and formal rules of work- ing, did not arise until the Greek influence of logic, analyt- ical and mathematical thought blended with Egyptian Magic.

When this synthesis was achieved, these instru- ments became the active components through which the magician impressed his Will and desire upon the universe, always in keeping with the philosophy and theology of Hermetic Tradition that also arose through this synthesis. It is true that the earliest Egyptian magicians did use simple tools and in a more meaningfully ordered way than those that were employed in other earlier cultures and those that existed during the time when Egypt was at its zenith.

But not even here did the thoughtful, intelligent design of ritual and ceremonial actions take place until the Graeco-Egyptian papyri manuscripts came into being through the Greek effort. And while the magical weapons or instruments used in Hermetic Magic as it exists today are the simplest of all, they are in no way to be confused with the simplicity of tools used in the earth religions. The theory underlying the rituals of this Hermetic Current, and the practice of this type of magic, creates as great a strain on the mental structure, psychic nature and very real spiri- tual faculties of the Operator, as much as any of the High Ceremonial Magic rituals in our contemporary Western System of Magic do.

And here. Evocation is one such example. Unlike some of the pop, convenient, instant gratifica- tion so-called rituals of some elements of the Modern Era Magic that we find ourselves in today, this original Hermetic Magic does not demand a slavish repetition of ancient rituals. Rather, just as it did fifteen hundred to two thousand years ago when Hermetic Magic was being forged by the Greeks, this unusual form of magic even now not simply encourages, but demands a modern synthe- Ceremonial Magic 39 sis of the ancient theory, theology, and philosophy of the rituals within the life of the contemporary magician.

This can only be accomplished through experiencing the rituals in actual practice. When such a synthesis is achieved, a new, personal system of magic arises for the individual Practitioner. In this case, a Hermetic System of Magic, as strange and as differ- ent from the Hebraic-based Western System we have today, as can possibly be imagined. In keeping with such a desire, to those individuals who decide to study the under- lying theory and theology of this system of magic, and who wish to practice it, I highly recommend the books by Flowers and Betz cited earlier and detailed in the Sug- gested Reading List.

Those who do so, will find that Her- metic Magic is magic in its purest and finest form.

Lisiewski, Joseph C.

Dark Ages Era Magic — C. Most academic sources include the Dark Ages as a part of the Medieval or Middle Ages era, and cite the time-line for this period as being between C. Others narrow the era of the Dark Ages between C. For our purposes, I have adopted the latter conven- tion. With the fall of Rome, civilization as the world knew it ended. Roman law and justice, enforced through its mili- tary might, came to a sudden and abrupt end. For over five hundred years, the glory that was Rome, itself an eclectic synthesis of the Greek and earlier cultures, disappeared from the face of the earth.

Its art, political structure, philosophy, and education in the classics, ceased in the twinkling of an eye. When the Roman sun set, the western world entered a time of extreme social repression and all intellectual growth was extinguished. Raiders from the north — the Northmen — burned, raped and pillaged hamlets, villages, and towns at will. There was no protec- tive force to stop them. There is a prayer from this era of the Dark Ages that sums up very well the desperation of the people of that time.

Life shifted from the cities to rural areas, as the seat of government and the orderly regulation of the daily affairs of life faded away. With that shift and the migration it generated, came a time of personal contraction. At best, life was a horrible daily struggle. To live from sunrise to sunset and see the return of the sun again was a feat that required all of one's resources: mental and physical, for the spiritual sun had set along with the Roman one.

It was in the shadows of this nightmare world that, not coincidentally, Christianity arose and entrenched itself firmly in the individual psyche for the next fifteen hundred years. Ironically, the meteoric rise of this religion began under the Roman Emperor Constantine in C. Imagine yourself living in this time. While wrestling with the earth to grow enough food if you were lucky enough to have a hovel in the forest and access to a small piece of land, or doing menial work for those a little better off than you, there would be death and destruction con- stantly pulling at your ragged clothing from every side.

Is it any wonder that your attention moved away from living a long and happy life in this world, to the acceptance of a creed that promised you eternal joy around the throne of God if you sought salvation and only salvation while in this life? Of course such salvation could only be obtained by complete and blind acceptance of the Christian church in its entirety.

Its dogma and doctrine replaced all dreams and aspirations. Attendance and participation in its first creation, the synthetic ritual called "The Celebration of the Mass," was an absolute, mandatory requirement. The minimum participation demanded at least once a week attendance to the Sunday Sabbath; more often, if your wretched life condition permitted it.

The new authority of your world of the living dead — the Priests— became the keepers of the keys to the Gates of Heaven by which you were to enter. Rigid and absolute obedience to their word as preached from the Gospels, and to their own personal whims, was now the guiding light in Ceremonial Magic 41 your life. The complex, highly successful societal structure of Roman civilization was thus greatly simplified. They were the masters, the givers of daily as well as spiritual law.

You were now a single element in that pathetic body they termed the faithful, or willing slave if you prefer. You were not fit to understand and interpret the Bible, if in- deed, you were fortunate enough to have been taught to read by someone who had learned from another, and if you had a copy of that rare document of salvation.

Only the priests, those ordained by Holy Mother Church and the 'true' representatives of Christ on earth, could do this. And so you obeyed. If you were somehow 'blessed by the grace of God,' you were recruited by the local priest at an early age, and entered the only common organization of the church that provided a substantial measure of physical protection and sustenance.

This would be the monastery, where you became a Brother. There, you were taught to read and write, but only such approved works as the Gospels and writings of the early saints. After awhile, you came to learn from the hushed whisperings of older Brothers, of the collections of heretical works kept under lock and key by the Head Abbot in massive reserves in forbidden areas of the monastery. Such horrific manuscripts presented the details of Roman law and justice, pagan literature, damnable art treasures that portrayed the naked human body, and yes, even those disgusting writings of the Greeks that dared to teach the principles of logic, mathematics, and the work- ings of the human mind and soul, all of which portrayed the world around you as something worth studying and understanding, in an attempt to provide some control over it.

All were there, but only for the eyes of high ranking, privileged church hierarchy. They were not for you. They could study them in order to teach you what was best for you. But certainly, you were unfit for such "works of the devil. But the early church took this continually evolving hierarchal structure much further.

Even if you were excep- tional and were later 'educated' as a priest, yet you were allowed only those approved works determined by some one in the next tier above you. Whether you had a tiny, poorly constructed church in the middle of some forest that your peasant faithful worshiped in, or if you were called to fulfill the duties of a scribbler, as the term of the day was used to denote a scribe, your life was severely limited. This church structure was purposely designed by the higher ups in the church, both to maintain their political positions of power and their offices, in order to pass them down to their sons, as was the tradition of the early church.

So even if you were one of the chosen, your life was by all standards, only a couple of cuts above the peas- ants that labored in your church every Sunday for the inspiration and succor they needed to somehow inch through yet another week of 'living. If you were like the herd of the faithful — whether you administered the Word of God or were one of those administered to — your only relief and way of escape was that which still terrifies all men and women today: the cold and silence of the grave.

Imagine being born into such a world. Put mildly, discontent was everywhere. Members of the church were not exempt from the natural, human longings to have and be more in this life; to accomplish feats of wonder in any field of human endeavor, and be remembered for their work after living long, healthy, happy, and prosperous lives in the here and now.

To the average peasant, this was impossible of course. But to a member of the clergy with a moderate or even rudimen- tary education, the good life was not an impossibility. After all, he heard of those forbidden books kept tucked away by the Abbot. Books of Roman and Greek origin, also reputed to be Hermetic in nature, yielding power and prize to those who could study them and work their wonders. I can only Ceremonial Magic 43 speculate here, as there are no records to confirm or deny this.

But based upon the scenario given above, much of which has been documented in historical tracts of the Dark Ages and the Christian church of the time, it is reasonable to think it was only a small leap for discontented clerics of every garb and station to realize that the basis of their own religion surely must offer the means and ways to the better life the higher ups in their own church were enjoying on a daily basis. Power, prestige, love, fame, all were there for the taking. If only Gradually, over the first few centuries, bits and pieces of the few Hermetic texts available leaked out.

A trusted scribbler here and there made an extra copy of the forbid- den text his Abbot or Bishop ordered him to copy, while another copied sections of other tracts he was commis- sioned by his superior to adorn with the latest approved church art deco. Slowly but surely, by couriered letters and word of mouth, discontented clerics began comparing notes, holding secret meetings, and spreading the word and content of the practice of magic to their tightly knit brethren of like mind.

But as we also know, the great bulk of genuine, origi- nal Hermetic texts were sealed away in the secret cloisters of Hermetic magicians in the Mediterranean, only to be discovered centuries later by Western archeologists and then exported to Western Europe in the early years of the first decade of the 19th century, a historical perspective mentioned in a number of scholarly works, including Fragment of a Graeco-Egyptian Work Upon Magic, produced by Charles Wycliffe Goodwin for the Cambridge Antiquar- ian Society in Nevertheless, the Hermetic influence spread by those few manuscripts and excerpts of early discontented clerics and genuine church scholars of the day, and it had an impact on the developing Christian church and the church fathers.

Think not? Read the 4th century C. Didymus the Blind. There you will find direct quotes from hermetic texts of the day. And yet his treatise was a schol- arly though dogmatic rendition of the principles behind the concept of God as being three persons in one, the very foundation of Christianity!

Flowers points out that both Lactantius in the 3rd cen- tury C. These texts were then re-discovered by later clerics of the Dark Ages, and the synthesis of the grimoires began. As mentioned previously, and as the study of medieval history reveals, the Christian church became firmly estab- lished with the fall of Rome. People had nowhere else to turn for the authority they needed to govern their daily lives.

With its ever-increasing stranglehold upon the lives of the people, the Christian church quickly recognized its own doctrines had to be strictly enforced. First, among its own clergy, and through them, to the faithful. Of paramount importance was the absolute public elimination of anything pagan.

Anything connected with the worship of many gods was ruthlessly suppressed, if not outright destroyed. Even though the Christian Doctrine of Philoque, which holds to the theme of three persons in one God, and the concept of saints a minor-god corollary to the polytheistic basis of paganism , contradicted its stand against the matter of many gods, pagan polytheistic concepts were nevertheless rooted-out and eliminated. Such exalted matters as the Doctrine of Philoque and the concept of Sainthood were theologically separated from daily church matters early in the church's history, and closely guarded.

These concerns were only to be interpreted by the highest elect of Holy Mother Church. This was and still is the attitude directed by the Vatican not only toward its common members, but toward the average cleric as well. Any texts other than its Ceremonial Magic 45 own were abolished and forbidden under pain of damna- tion. Chief among the prohibited works was the scarce body of hermetic texts, ironically used by the earliest church scholars to pound out their own theology! No doubt it was due to this scarcity, as well as the human need to fashion a new creation, that the earliest grimoires arose.

However, the same disgruntled clerics, also convinced of the sanctity of the church and heavenly power, turned from trying to produce grammars of magic from the few hermetic manu- scripts available, to generating their own magical texts, based primarily on church liturgy and extracts from the performance of the catholic Mass.

This grimoire may be the earliest grammar of a Christian-based system of magic known. In it, the use of prayers and the employment of canonical hours for their recitation certainly indicate that the book, as it appears today, was probably produced during the early 13th or 14th century.

However, of the two original manuscripts extant— Sloane MS. Book 1, Concerning the Seal of God and the Attainment of the Beatific Vision, is clearly of Dark Ages origin in its language, speech, content and purpose, when compared to the more familiar contents of Books 2 and 3. Additionally, in my opinion. Book 1 contains a heavy Augustinian influence, while the other two books are more pragmatic in aim; the type of pragmatism that is seen to clearly govern the writing in later grimoires, as in the case of Clavicula Salomonis or The Greater Key of Solomon the King.

While touted by 'modern authorities' as being unusable in a practical sense, two things must be remembered. First, there is a terribly fragmented work not to be confused with The Sworn Book bearing the title The Book of Honourius, also referred to as, or appearing under its other title of. The Book ofHonourius the Magician. This is a true hodgepodge of excerpts taken from several grimoires 46 Joseph C.

It may very well be a relatively recent attempt at producing a new grimoire, although I personally feel it is a botched attempt to either confuse this already unclear area of magic, or to simply lead gullible individuals looking for a quick solution to their problems astray. In its own right then, it is useless as a manual of practical magical evocation. Secondly, it must be remembered that any of the gri- moires, of whatever period of history, are themselves the synthesis of numerous hands, as The Sworn Book itself may very well have been.

Given this, it is my opinion there is nothing in the edition of The Sworn Book ofHonourius the Magician referred to here to stop the ambitious and knowl- edgeable but cautious Practitioner from attempting to operate from it. I say cautious because The Sworn Book is essentially a framework of evocation. It does not, for example, give directions for the preparation and consecration of weapons and materials to be used in the ritual.

Rather, as Daniel J. Driscoll points out in the most literate and workable edi- tion of this text with which I am familiar, the Practitioner using it was assumed to have taken some degree of eccle- siastical training, and hence would know how to prepare the various impedimenta required. Again, this is an indica- tion of the Christian basis of the magic that evolved from the Hermetic stream.

I might add that Waite refers to another version of this work, entitled The Grimoire ofHonourius the Great, otherwise referred to as "Honourius the Third. While Eliphas Levi also commented upon this text as having some importance for the student, I have not seen a complete copy of this partic- ular version of the work, but only excerpts of it. Essentially it is the same in composition and style as The Sworn Book.

Likewise, The Enchiridion of Pope Leo, which is believed to have first appeared in print in Rome in , gives " The Book of Ceremo- nial Magic, states. But by comparing the content, structure, style, and especially the language employed in these prayers with missals of the time, it is clear that this collec- tion— the very basis of the magical text— predates 1, C. Thus, the very basis of this grimoire has its birth in the era of the Dark Ages.

Yet these prayers find their final use in the latter magical tract, which as pointed out, is of much later origin. Such conclusions are important, in that they serve to show the evolution of essential magical material that would be fashioned into magical thought proper during the Renaissance period. Another unusual manuscript of interest is The Sword of Moses, an ancient Hebrew or possibly Aramaic book of magic believed to date back to the 10th century C.

This text, translated by M. Gaster in , deals with the use of a magical sword reigned over by angels who were to "attach" themselves to the magician who properly pro- nounced a special conjuration over the sword, after the appropriate personal preparation and summoning the angels who governed the magical weapon. The names of the angels are completely unintelligible, although the ran- domness of their spelling is similar to the Barbarous Words of Evocation or Words of Power. They also bear an uncanny resemblance to Enochian names and words that would come into use centuries later due to the work of Dr.

John Dee and Edward Kelly. It is interesting to note that even in this 10th century manuscript, there is a distinctive Hermetic style as far as the structure of the manuscript is concerned. Yet, possibly due to its Aramaic or Hebraic influence, it was all but lost or rejected by the early Chris- tian cleric-magicians, who opted to devise their own gri- Waite, Arthur Edward. The Book of Ceremonial Magic. A Complete Grimoire.

Ceremonial Magic & The Power of Evocation

University Books, Inc. In the end then, the grimoires as we know them today are chiefly of Christian origin, based upon church cere- monial and spiritual ideas, although later secular influ- ences would import the Hebraic Kabbalah into these texts, and expand upon them in ways more familiar to the West- ern European mind. Due to the relatively few known magical texts that have survived from this period, we have to begin at the end of this time period and work our way backward.

For it was at the end of this period that Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa von Nettesheim was born in Cologne, Germany, in The works of Albertus Magnus, which were pro- duced from circa to his death in , served as fuel for Agrippa's intense interest in hidden, or occult, matters. This we know from a letter he wrote to Theodoricus, the bishop of Cyrene. In that letter, Agrippa states that one of the first books on magic that he ever studied was Albertus' Speculum.

No doubt, other now lost occult, magical writings and even grimoires from the Dark Ages were also at his disposal during that time. In addition, that Agrippa's writings also reflect much of the earlier Pagan and Neoplatonic magical work of the Hermetic period is obvious, as anyone with even a modest background in Hermetics will quickly note when studying the Three Books. After attending Agrippa's style, along with the works of Albertus Magnus that have survived, I think it is fair to conclude that it was Agrippa who rescued some of those early, primarily unknown Dark Ages grammars which are the subject of concern here, and combined them into his now famous Three Books of Occult Philosophy, the texts that literally serve as the foundation matter for both the Renais- sance Era magic and that of the contemporary Western Magical Tradition.

Ceremonial Magic 49 Another reason Agrippa is credited with carrying over the magic of the Dark Ages can also be presumed from the heavy influence of his senior, Johannes Trithemius The close, mentor-student relationship between this German abbot and Agrippa is well documented. Owing to Trithemius' own mystical writings, it is almost certain that the abbot had a pronounced effect upon the young Agrippa.

Donald Tyson, writing in his splendidly edited and annotated edition of the Three Books, states that it may be that the abbot was not simply Agrippa's counselor and friend, but his master and teacher — particularly in the area of magical evocation. This view is most certainly correct, as the evidence points in that direction, not the least of which is that contributed by Henry Morley in his classic work.

The Life of Henry Cornelius Agrippa. But there is another matter to be considered here in terms of the abbot having more than a mild interest and effect on the young Agrippa. The Three Books were written by Agrippa in and the early part of To me, it is a far reach indeed to conclude that a youth of twenty-three years could have amassed such vast amounts of knowl- edge and experience even with the help of his master Trithemius, especially given Agrippa's constant wander- ings and perpetually meager financial resources. Theory is one thing. Writing from experience, as Agrippa's Three Books certainly illustrate, is quite another.

Yet he does write with authority, and it is an authority that, in my opinion, surpasses his age at the time this was written. Additionally, if Trithemius' most famous and notori- ous work, the three books of his Steganographia or Secret Writing are examined, the depth of the man's knowledge and mystical insight becomes abundantly clear. At first glance, the Steganographia seems to describe a system of angelic magic. But within it is a highly sophisticated sys- tem of cryptography; one that claims to house a synthesis of the mechanics of memory, the science of knowledge, a unique language learning system, practical magic, and a method of transmitting messages without the use of sym- bols.

In private circulation, the Steganographia produced such panic and dread among those who managed to acquire a private copy of it, that Trithemius decided it should never be published. As such, it continued to circulate in manu- script form quietly, until it was finally published in , long after the abbot's death.

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