Russia After the War: Hopes, Illusions and Disappointments, 1945-1957

Russia After the War: Hopes, Illusions and Disappointments, 1945-1957
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Russia After the War: Hopes, Illusions and Disappointments, (The New Russian History) [Elena Zubkova, University of Alabama University of. Elena Zubkova, Russia After the War. Hopes, Illusions, and Disappointments, Maureen Perrie. Pages | Published.

Published November 2nd by Routledge first published August 1st More Details Original Title. Other Editions 4. Friend Reviews.

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See his picks. After the war the composition of the population of Leningrad was significantly renewed. Books by Elena Zubkova. By allowing the public to participate in the latter process, he hoped to win broad support for the former. Revolution on my mind.

Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Seeking to challenge the conception of the Soviet population as submissive and obsequious, the author details the limited rise of dissent during the post-World War II period and explains why opposition did not coalesce further. In doing so she addresses the largest segment of society, but the one whose voice remained mostly muted in previous studies.

Rather than blaming the individuals for their lack of political action, however, the author demonstrates that conditions were not conducive to resistance of any kind. Frightened by state-encouraged rumors of another impending conflict with the west, the Soviet populace accepted a lack of reform and a harsh postwar existence such as continued rationing because they believed that it meant that the Soviet system could remain strong and avoid an invasion.

EBSEES search: hits for Russia, USSR, Russia (Federation) / History ( - ) on page 1

This was aided by a significant degree of genuine belief in Stalin and his prescience to always do what was best for the nation. The poor living conditions and failed policies, however, as well as the specific disadvantages faced by groups such as veterans, former prisoners-of-war, non-Russians, and ex-political prisoners, eventually took their toll on society. Instead, the Soviet leadership was faced with general dissent, the gripes of the people, and new forms of thinking.

She highlights "kowtowing to the west" ie. They failed to place the blame where it belonged, on internal mistakes, because the infallibility of the system was essential to their ruling dictum. When the response turned out to be minimal, Stalin took up a role as the ultimate arbiter of knowledge and, by decreeing a "correct" form of academia, was able to repress academic and cultural dissonance. From a broader standpoint, however, the government's actions suppressed only the outward symptoms of dissent and exacerbated the true causes by allowing them to fester. In other words, they did not address the true social problems by admitting policy errors, but instead claimed that people's perceptions were incorrect due to Western intrigues.

In addition, the repression drove dissent underground instead of allowing it a degree of freedom that might have led to substantive changes. Her book is heavy on description, information, and source reproduction, but lighter on analysis, and the themes that she introduces at the beginning are peppered only sparsely throughout the text. This can make her work dry at times, despite the nature of her discoveries, because it becomes difficult to get through the sheer volume of findings. Her book is not anchored around a strong, central argument or unifying theme and thus signposting and recapitulation are minimal, and revelations are often made without being distilled into general trends or grander conclusions.

Overall, Russia After the War is, as an early paradigm-shifting text, an essential read for students of the Soviet Union, but one that may come off as not having aged well, and that has likely been superseded by more analytical studies. As such, it may not be appreciated by the casual scholar for its significant contribution to the historiography.

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Hugh Ragsdale Editor. Hugh Regsdale Editor. The years of late Stalinism are one of the murkiest periods in Soviet history, best known to us through the voices of Ehrenburg, Khrushchev and Solzhenitsyn. This is a sweeping history of Russia from the end of the war to the Thaw by one of Russia's respected younger historians.

Drawing on the resources of newly opened archives as well as the recent outpouring of published The years of late Stalinism are one of the murkiest periods in Soviet history, best known to us through the voices of Ehrenburg, Khrushchev and Solzhenitsyn.

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Drawing on the resources of newly opened archives as well as the recent outpouring of published diaries and memoirs, Elena Zubkova presents a richly detailed portrayal of the basic conditions of people's lives in Soviet Russia from to She brings out the dynamics of postwar popular expectations and the cultural stirrings set in motion by the wartime experience versus the regime's determination to reassert command over territories and populations and the mechanisms of repression.

Her interpretation of the period establishes the context for the liberalizing and reformist impulses that surfaced in the post-Stalin succession struggle, characterizing what would be the formative period for a future generation of leaders: Gorbachev, Yeltsin and their contemporaries. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published November 2nd by Routledge first published August 1st More Details Original Title. Other Editions 4.

The European Bibliography of Slavic and East European Studies (EBSEES) - 1991-2007

Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Russia After the War , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. Sort order. Seeking to challenge the conception of the Soviet population as submissive and obsequious, the author details the limited rise of dissent during the post-World War II period and explains why opposition did not coalesce further.

In doing so she addresses the largest segment of society, but the one whose voice remained mostly muted in previous studies. Rather than blaming the individuals for their lack of political action, however, the author demonstrates that conditions were not conducive to resistance of any kind. Frightened by state-encouraged rumors of another impending conflict with the west, the Soviet populace accepted a lack of reform and a harsh postwar existence such as continued rationing because they believed that it meant that the Soviet system could remain strong and avoid an invasion.

This was aided by a significant degree of genuine belief in Stalin and his prescience to always do what was best for the nation.