Prophecy and Change (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

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The resistance fighter who aided her former oppressors in their struggle for liberation and emerged as the leader she never imagined herself becoming. The orphaned alien whose quest for his own identity became the salvation of a quadrant. Rediscover this extraordinary saga in a landmark collection of tales that confronts assumptions, divulges secrets, and asks as many questions as it answers.

These stories, entwined with familiar episodes, reveal the world of Deep Space Nine anew as told by Christopher L. He lives with his family in New York City.

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See All Customer Reviews. Shop Books. Read an excerpt of this book! Add to Wishlist. USD Sign in to Purchase Instantly. Overview Love and Hate. About the Author Marco Palmieri is a popular editor, writer, and walking encyclopedia of Star Trek lore. Show More. Average Review. Write a Review. Related Searches. Continuing the powerful story of Jim Kirk's lost friend, the man who helped shape a There was a real darkness, and I think that deeply influenced the style of the show.

As it turns out, that darkness and moral ambiguity was light years ahead of its time. Nowadays, audiences all but expect a series to present them with complex characters filled with flaws and doubts. Turn it down.

Table of Contents

But Berman called Visitor and pitched her on the vision for the show — and on Kira, a former member of a terrorist organization who had moved into a military position in a newly liberated society. I hated every part that I had to play where I was chastising a husband or getting upset about the carpet. And I did a lot of those. Any time I could get my teeth into something, that was my flow state.

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Prophecy and Change Anthology

Major Kira was like Disneyland for an actor. Fan reception to the character, and to the show as a whole, ran hot and cold. None had been a war veteran with emotional skeletons. Very fallible, but growing and trying. Available on Netflix and CBS All Access, the series lends itself more to binge viewing than most other dramas of its era. He'd previously released the acclaimed novel A Stitch in Time , a further exploration of the character, as well as a play.

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This is to date his last mark on Garak, and it shows, because Robinson becomes fairly existentially expansive. If anyone else had written the story, it would have rung as hollow as the majority of the material in the collection. And yet he has such a command, a grasp of things, that you accept whatever twists come along even at their wildest. It's ironic that the collection ends up being so kind to Cardassians, when the series itself sometimes seemed to go out of its way to ensure the audience had as low an opinion of them as the Bajorans did.

But in literature, in truly exceptional literature, that's how it goes, isn't it? May 14, Daniel Kukwa rated it it was amazing Shelves: star-trek. Everything that is wonderful about Deep Space Nine is distilled within the stories found in this beautiful collection. No "Star Trek" series ever displayed the intensity that DS9 possessed; the battles, the drama, the character depth, even the humour Ahead of its time yet timeless -- something best said about both DS9 the series, and this celebratory short story collection.

May 01, Jen rated it really liked it. Right, so I know I'm 20 years late to the game, but I just watched DS9 for this first time this past winter and I fell head over heels in love with it. I've been reading fanfiction online, but it's fun to get into the published fanfiction which, let's face it, is what this is. This is my first Star Trek book, and it is absolutely worth it. I could do without the frame narrative, which is basically a reworking of Jake's dialogue from "The Visitor" to set up the reason for these stories, but then Right, so I know I'm 20 years late to the game, but I just watched DS9 for this first time this past winter and I fell head over heels in love with it.

I could do without the frame narrative, which is basically a reworking of Jake's dialogue from "The Visitor" to set up the reason for these stories, but then I can almost always do without frame narratives. They rarely do anything for me. I do appreciate that every story is introduced with where it is relative to the show, so I knew what the characters know and what they couldn't, yet while the story was happening.

In the B story, Bashir with whom I am madly in love, so that's going to color every story that even tangentially mentions him, sorry not sorry and Jake talk to the citizens who are also getting used to this new reality. I accept this whole thing as headcanon, for sure. Martin and Mangels nail the maneuvering and intrigue of it, though, and I was totally on board for how they worked against both the Maquis and the Cardassians.

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The Federation and the Klingon Empire want to wield Thrawn : Treason Star Wars. It is interesting to note that the Dominion War did not happen as of the s anyway in the alternate time line. Peace and War. Cold Equations: The Persistence of Memory. TV Guide called this result a "shocker", surprised that "the least popular incarnation of Star Trek has produced the most popular show".

This is one where I can tell that my love of Bashir is coloring my review because it wasn't quite as strong as the first two but I love it to pieces anyway. I do appreciate the examination of just how bad an idea that pairing is culturally and personality-wise, so it's a good story that's just my cup of tea. It's made so much more painful if you know Ziyal's fate. I really liked how neatly it fit in-between episodes, picking up right where a scene left off and leaving room for the next scene to start. Smart writing with a great knock on the door of the moral ambiguity DS9 was so good at presenting, and again, much more painful if you know Jadzia's fate.

It is heartbreaking and makes me hate the Dominion that much more, so a very effective story. I would love to see this staged because I think it would be beautiful in an end-ofA-Space-Odyssey kind of way. Makes me glad I have "The Lives of Dax" on the way to read and compare. Again again, much more painful when you know the fate of most of the people mentioned.

This was trippy AF and now I want to track down "Stitch in Time" so much more and I am so sad that Garak's beloved Cardassia is falling apart so hard and I want to know what happens next. Write more, Andy! Jan 08, Jessica rated it liked it Shelves: genre-star-trek.

Star Trek DS9 Documentary Interview

Jan 13, Ross Vincent rated it really liked it Shelves: tbr This year being the 25th anniversary of the first broadcast of Deep Space Nine, I figured I would read the anthology they did for the 10th anniversary. Over all, I enjoyed it. Some answered questions that had never been addressed. Others gave insight into characters. Little disappointed in the last chapter - I think Stitch in Time set the bar high, and anything revisiting that couldn't measure up.

May 12, Impoeia rated it it was ok Shelves: science-fiction , star-trek. I always love new insights into the DS9 universe.

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And while this anthology featured some of my favourite characters, some of the stories came off a little weak. Una McCormack's story was definitely the best one of the bunch and mostly saved the rest of the book. Fun for any DS9-lover, but certainly not the must-read I was hoping for. Jun 05, Robert Jenkins rated it really liked it Shelves: star-trek. Pretty good anthology of stories celebrating the 10th anniversary of DS9 in I'm reading this as part of my personal project to read every Pocket Star Trek novel published.

Jun 23, Caleris rated it really liked it Shelves: star-trek. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Sorry, the private notes box is too small Kai Winn tries to return an Orb from Cardassia to Bajor. Many chars, most interestingly showing Nog's evolution from typical Ferengi to thinking about joining Starfleet.

Brief Garak. Grilka comes to Quark again for aid. Mostly Quark, love story. Jake on DS9 under Dominion control, writing things, makes friends with Ziyal but then Ziyal dies and he's sad. Jadzia wrestles with death and the ethics of using biogenic weapons on the Jem'Hadar. I found it And the ending was just jarring. Odo works with Thrax to investigate an incident, that turns out not to be what it seems. Decent mystery story and characterization. Ezri Dax has to save the world or something. I didn't care for it, too overblown and "grand". Ziyal's death and prejudices hang between them like a suffocating cloud, but they try to work through it.

Excellent, 4. Philosophical as ever, ties up a few ends but pulls out new threads to follow. Recommended to Lisa Harmonybites by: Gerri's Gift? Shoreleave Gift Bag? Shelves: short-stories , science-fiction , fiction. This is an anthology of ten longish stories focusing on the characters of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine set from right after the pilot episode "Emissary" to well after the end of the series in the aftermath of the Dominion War. I find that Star Trek pro-fiction can be rather hit or miss--and at first I thought this would be a miss.

Editors usually choose their strongest story to open an anthology, hoping those taking a look will be pulled in. I wasn't taken with Summer's "Ha'mara" and left it think This is an anthology of ten longish stories focusing on the characters of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine set from right after the pilot episode "Emissary" to well after the end of the series in the aftermath of the Dominion War.

I wasn't taken with Summer's "Ha'mara" and left it thinking that if this were a novel, I might have stopped here, but being an anthology, the other entries might prove stronger--and after all, going by series chronological order as this book was, this being the first didn't mean this was the best the anthology had to offer. I was in the middle of the Martin and Magels' "The Orb of Opportunity," centered on Nog, when I decided that rather than putting the book down, I could just skip to the next story.

The next story "Broken Oaths" about Bashir and O'Brien and a crises in their friendship was in my estimation just okay. It says a lot about how strong were almost all the following stories that I wound up rating the book so highly. I adored " I very much liked the thoughtful Jarman story, "The Devil You Know" centered on Jadzia--and the ending was both perfect for the story and ironically poignant given Jadzia's fate.

Lang's "Foundlings" was another thoughtful story and deft character portrait--and as fitting concerning a story centered on Odo, a well-done mystery. Thorne's "Chiascuro" was not only a good Ezri story, but featured the strongest use of science fiction elements in the book. I thought McCormack's "Face Value" the standout story in the book, the one that provoked the greatest emotional reaction--the ending both gave me chills and made me choke up at the same time.

I didn't feel Robinson's "The Calling" was a strong closer. Centered on Garak and written by the actor who played him, it was based on a post-Deep Space Nine novel by Robinson, and it may be that not having read that book blunted it's impact, that this just isn't a story that can stand on its own.

Overall I wouldn't say this is as strong as the other Deep Space Nine anthology edited by Palmieri I just read, The Lives of Dax --but ultimately, there were some fine stories here that raised it for me to a keeper. Jan 31, Adam rated it liked it. I assume that most readers are picking this book up hoping to find some meaning to their lives after finishing all of DS9 in an incredible feat of binge watching.

Further, I assume that many of those readers are looking for Andrew J Robinson's "The Calling", a rare case of an actor competently writing the further adventures of a character they portrayed. If you haven't, find a copy then come back for this. But I assume that most readers are picking this book up hoping to find some meaning to their lives after finishing all of DS9 in an incredible feat of binge watching.

But of course this is an anthology, and a special one for attempting to fill the void of the show by showing the characters as they were, not after the final episode like the "relaunch" novels do.