The knockoff economy : how imitation sparks innovation

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Sprigman explains why this happens and what the phenomenon can teach us about other industries, such as the music and movie industries. You must log in to post a comment. Log in now. Previous post: Oldest printed book, published without copyright. The Center for the Study of Innovative Freedom C4SIF is dedicated to building public awareness of the manner in which laws and policies impede innovation, creativity, communication, learning, knowledge, emulation, and information sharing.

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The knockoff economy: Christopher Sprigman at TEDxCollegeofWilliam&Mary

Sign In Register Preferences. Thu, Nov 19th pm — Mike Masnick. If you liked this post, you may also be interested in Anonymous Coward , 19 Nov pm. The very nature of IP is to stifle any and all competition to PREVENT knockoffs, simulacrum, or improvements on original design so that the original IP holders can bilk as much out of the market as they can for bringing something new to market. Which is no longer the case.

Actually, your statement is, at best, imprecise with respect to patents. One of the oft-mentioned benefits of patents is that it drives alternative solutions that are non-infringing, thus creating parallel approaches that might not otherwise exist. As an example, the Wright brothers pursued patents on various airplane features for years. By the time the patents were validated, the industry had moved past their designs with different, non-infringing designs.

The Knockoff Economy: How Copying Benefits Everyone (Video)

One way to drive a completely different approach is to patent an approach and make it expensive to license it. People will come up with alternatives. As another, more recent example, virtually all mobile communication manufacturers are trying to come up with as many improvements on their competitor's technology as they possibly can to minimize the risk of getting sued for infringement. A similar thing is happening in the appliance industry. And while the length of patents has grown, it has been 20 years from the date of filing for some time now.

Subtract the time from filing to allowance, and you have roughly 17 years of life. The only question would be whether you consider 17 years to be short. If those 'alternative solutions' provide advantages over the existing ones the drive to find them is natural and not needing of any patents. What the patent ends up doing is forcing people into a less efficient and effective alternative solution merely to avoid infringement. This is socially harmful.

The Knockoff Economy : How Imitation Sparks Innovation - ykoketomel.ml

Furthermore patents may deter people from building upon something that is covered by a patent. The drive to come up with improvements isn't driven by patents it's driven by nature.

How Imitation Sparks Innovation

The Piracy Paradox Revisited. Best-selling in Non Fiction See all. And as they do, designers have to be ready with new designs. The drive to come up with improvements isn't driven by patents it's driven by nature. Resumo This paper aims to analyze the effects of knockoff economy in the intellectual property. Walter ed. Hard to tell what you are

People want to always improve things because a better solution to a problem makes their lives easier and makes businesses more efficient and allows them to offer better products than their competitors or to keep pace with their competitors. To attribute this to patents is silly. However what Techidrt and many others have highlighted over and over are examples of how patents hinder technology by allowing someone to get a general patent on something that's a natural technological progression and prevent others from using it.

Now others must find inefficient ways around the obvious and they are deterred from building upon such a technology at least until the patent runs out. The idea that the first person to get a patent on something is the only person that's going to come up with said idea within the next 20 years is absurd at best and based on a dishonest premise in all likelihood.

It's a pretext put forth by monopolists that simply want monopolies on the obvious so that they can use them to lock everyone out.

The mobile phone and tablet arenas are good examples of how patents have hindered progress. Not saying that all patents are bad but for things like Tech I think 20 years is absurdly long. Longer patents not sure about 20 years still, if you want to go with the argument that patents provide economic incentive to invest into something you must consider that the present value of a potential return in 20 years has a high probability of being smaller than the investment made and most investors expect their return to be well before 20 years to even consider it might be more justified with things like pharmaceuticals where years and years of testing maybe needed to ensure the safety of something.

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