Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain

ISBN 13: 9780521142250
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Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain

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Previous Figure Next Figure. Email or Customer ID. Forgot password? Old Password. New Password. Password Changed Successfully Your password has been changed. Returning user. Request Username Can't sign in? Forgot your username? Enter your email address below and we will send you your username. Using a series of original case studies, the book investigates the archaeological traces of cremation in a varied selection of prehistoric and historic contexts from the Mesolithic to the present in order to explore cremation from a practice-oriented and historically situated perspective.

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This volume addresses the relationship between archaeologists and the dead, through the many dimensions of their relationships: in the field through practical and legal issues ; in the lab through their analysis and interpretation ; and This volume addresses the relationship between archaeologists and the dead, through the many dimensions of their relationships: in the field through practical and legal issues ; in the lab through their analysis and interpretation ; and in their written, visual and exhibitionary practice - disseminated to a variety of academic and public audiences.

Written from a variety of perspectives, its authors address the experience, effect, ethical considerations, and cultural politics of working with mortuary archaeology. Whilst some papers reflect institutional or organisational approaches, others are more personal in their view: creating exciting and frank insights into contemporary issues which have hitherto often remained 'unspoken' amongst the discipline. Reframing funerary archaeologists as 'death-workers' of a kind, the contributors reflect on their own experience to provide both guidance and inspiration to future practitioners, arguing strongly that we have a central role to play in engaging the public with themes of mortality and commemoration, through the lens of the past.

Spurred by the recent debates in the UK, papers from Scandinavia, Austria, Italy, the US, and the mid-Atlantic, frame these issues within a much wider international context which highlights the importance of cultural and historical context in which this work takes place. Often fragmented and without context, early medieval inscribed and sculpted stone monuments of the fifth to eleventh centuries AD have been mainly studied via their shape, their decoration and the texts a fraction of them bear.

This book, This book, investigating stone monuments from Ireland, Britain and Scandinavia including the important memorials at Iniscealtra, County Clare , advocates three relatively new, distinctive and interconnected approaches to the lithic heritage of the early Middle Ages. Building on recent theoretical trends in archaeology and material culture studies in particular, it uses the themes of materiality, biography and landscape to reveal how carved stones created senses of identity and history for early medieval communities and kingdom. An extensive introduction and eight chapters span the disciplines of history, art-history and archaeology, exploring how shaping stone in turn shaped and re-shaped early medieval societies.

View on boydellandbrewer. More Info: Co-edited with Duncan Sayer.

View on amazon. More Info: Co-edited with Sarah Semple. View on oxbowbooks. Death and Memory in Early Medieval Britain more. View on cup. View on springer. More Info: Co-edited with Richard Bradley. Journal Articles. Our interpretation aims to move beyond regarding Our interpretation aims to move beyond regarding the Pillar as a prominent example of early medieval monument reuse and a probable early medieval assembly site.

We demonstrate that the location and topographical context of the cross and mound facilitated the monument's significance as an early medieval locus of power, faith and commemoration in a contested frontier zone. The specific choice of location is shown to relate to patterns of movement and visibility that may have facilitated and enhanced the ceremonial and commemorative roles of the monument. By shedding new light on the interpretation of the Pillar of Eliseg as a node of social and religious aggregation and ideological power, our study has theoretical and methodological implications for studying the landscape contexts of early medieval stone monuments.

Doi: This article explores a meshwork of citations to other material cultures and architectures created by the form and ornament of house-shaped early medieval recumbent stone monuments popularly known in Britain as 'hogbacks'. In addition to In addition to citing the form and ornament of contemporary buildings, shrines, and tombs, this article suggests recumbent mortuary monuments referenced a far broader range of contemporary portable artefacts and architectures.

The approach takes attention away from identifying any single source of origin for hogbacks. Instead, considering multi-scalar and multi-media references within the form and ornament of different carved stones provides the basis for revisiting their inherent variability and their commemorative efficacy by creating the sense of an inhabited mortuary space in which the dead are in dialogue with the living.

By alluding to an entangled material world spanning Norse and Insular, ecclesiastical and secular spheres, hogbacks were versatile technologies of mortuary remembrance in the Viking Age. Viking mortuary citations more. The contributions to the collection are reviewed in relation to strengths and weaknesses in existing research and broader themes in mortuary archaeological research into memory work in past societies. View on intarch. Reconsidering the West Kirby hogback more. This paper presents a fresh reading of a significant early medieval recumbent stone monument from West Kirby, Merseyside formerly Cheshire.

Rather than being a single-phased hogback, later subject to damage, it is argued that West Kirby Rather than being a single-phased hogback, later subject to damage, it is argued that West Kirby 4 might have been carved in successive phases, possibly by different hands. Through a review of the monument's historiography and a detailed reappraisal of the details and parallels of its form, ornament and material composition, the paper reconsiders the commemorative significance of this recumbent stone monument for the locality, region and understanding of Viking Age sculpture across the British Isles.

As a result, West Kirby's importance as an ecclesiastical locale in the Viking Age is reappraised. This trend also reflects the growth of new theoretical approaches to the biographies, materialities and landscape settings of particular monuments and assemblages.

This article reconsiders and extends our interpretation of the heterogeneity of early Anglo-Saxon c. Cremation burials frequently contain grooming Cremation burials frequently contain grooming implements combs, tweezers, razors and shears , often unburnt and sometimes fragmented. This article explores new evidence to reveal the varied character and fluctuating intensity of these practices between cremating communities across southern and eastern England during the fifth and sixth centuries AD.

The evidence suggests new insights into how and why cremation was selected as an ideology of transformation linking the living and the dead. Virtually dead: digital public mortuary archaeology more. Over recent decades, the ethics, politics and public engagements of mortuary archaeology have received sustained scrutiny, including how we handle, write about and display the archaeological dead. Yet the burgeoning use of digital media Yet the burgeoning use of digital media to engage different audiences in the archaeology of death and burial have so far escaped attention.

This article explores categories and strategies by which digital media create virtual communities engaging with mortuary archaeology. Considering digital public mortuary archaeology DPMA as a distinctive theme linking archaeology, mortality and material culture, we discuss blogs, vlogs and Twitter as case studies to illustrate the variety of strategies by which digital media can promote, educate and engage public audiences with archaeological projects and research relating to death and the dead in the human past.

Project Eliseg involved three field seasons —12 of survey and excavation at the multi-period mortuary and commemorative monument known as the Pillar of Eliseg, near Llangollen, Denbighshire, Wales. Each season incorporated an Each season incorporated an evolving range of media and public engagement activities, with digital media employed to disseminate ongoing work both globally and locally, including to those unable to access the site during the excavation seasons.

One of the key strategies employed via digital media in seasons 2 and 3 was a daily video-blog hereafter: vlog. This article presents and appraises the rationale, design, content and reception of the Project Eliseg vlog revealing key lessons in the use of digital media in archaeological fieldwork, particularly for those engaged with the archaeology of death, burial and commemoration.

Blog bodies: mortuary archaeology and blogging more. View on hdl. Antiquity at the National Memorial Arboretum more. Monument and material reuse at the National Memorial Arboretum more. Exploring the relocation and reuse of fragments and whole artefacts, materials and monuments in contemporary commemorative memorials in the United Kingdom UK , this paper focuses on the National Memorial Arboretum Alrewas, Exploring the relocation and reuse of fragments and whole artefacts, materials and monuments in contemporary commemorative memorials in the United Kingdom UK , this paper focuses on the National Memorial Arboretum Alrewas, Staffordshire, hereafter NMA.

Within this unique assemblage of memorial gardens, reuse constitutes a distinctive range of material commemoration. Monument and material reuse is identified as a form of commemorative rehabilitation for displaced memorials and provides powerful and direct mnemonic and emotional connections between past and present in the commemoration through peace memorials, of military disasters and defensive actions, the sufferings of prisoners of war, and atrocities inflicted upon civilian populations. In exploring monument and material reuse to create specific emotive and mnemonic fields and triggers, this paper engages with a hitherto neglected aspect of late 20th- and early 21st-century commemorative culture.

View on archaeologybulletin. In recent decades, memory groves have been adapted and condensed from their original suburban In recent decades, memory groves have been adapted and condensed from their original suburban cemetery locations and added to rural churchyard settings. Eschewing individual memorials with text or images, memory groves serve as architectonic environments that facilitate the staging of the presence of the cremated dead and encouraging ongoing relationships between the living and the dead through personal commemorative practice.

I argue that memory groves choreograph commemoration through the diffusion and sublimation of ashes into landscape utopias with implicit, and sometimes explicit, archaeological themes. Using memory groves as a case study, the paper seeks to demonstrate the potential in the archaeological investigation of contemporary death and its material culture. Ashes to asses: An archaeological perspective on death and donkeys more. This article considers the Donkey Sanctuary, Sidmouth, Devon, UK, as an example of how animal rescue centres and sanctuaries have developed in the UK over the last 30 years as a new form of charity-run commemorative landscape.

Human ashes Human ashes are scattered in the Sanctuary grounds, memorial plaques cover the buildings of the Sanctuary, and many more are set on benches and beside memorial trees around the donkey paddocks. Through text and material culture, these memorials constitute a commemorative parity between people and animals in death, and the Donkey Sanctuary has become a complex memorial landscape. Archaeologists on Contemporary Death more.

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This Special Issue of the journal Mortality explores archaeological approaches to recent and contemporary death-ways. Using this case study, it is argued that the current theories and parameters of both mortuary archaeology and public archaeology fail to adequately engage with the diverse community perceptions and concerns over mortality and commemoration. Password Changed Successfully Your password has been changed. Throwing light on an important aspect of medieval society, this book is essential reading for archaeologists and historians with an interest in the early medieval period. This article explores a meshwork of citations to other material cultures and architectures created by the form and ornament of house-shaped early medieval recumbent stone monuments popularly known in Britain as 'hogbacks'.

This Special Issue of the journal Mortality explores archaeological approaches to recent and contemporary death-ways. The six studies four by archaeologists, one by two forensic archaeologists and one by a social anthropologist focus on The six studies four by archaeologists, one by two forensic archaeologists and one by a social anthropologist focus on mortuary practices in Canada, Sweden, Denmark and the UK in recent times. Together, they investigate the rapidly changing practices and varying materialities of death during the twentieth century and the beginning of the third millennium.

The sense of being seen: ocular effects at Sutton Hoo more. The early seventh-century AD burial chamber constructed within a ship beneath Mound 1 at I argue that this ocular quality to the art — not simply visually striking but affording the sense of animated, watching presences — was integral to the selection of artefacts for burial. I argue that the beastly, monstrous and humanoid eyes commemorated the dead person as all-seeing.

Those witnessing the staged wrapping and consignment of the artefacts were afforded the sense of being all-seen. By exploring art in this elite mortuary context, the article presents a case study in the early medieval archaeology of the senses. The landscape of a Swedish boat-grave cemetery more. Death becomes us more. More Info: published in the popular art and archaeology magazine 'Minerva'. View on journals.

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Evaluating Community Archaeology in the UK more. Does community archaeology work? In the UK over the last decade, there has been a boom in projects utilising the popular phrase 'community archaeology'.

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These projects can take many different forms and have ranged from the public face of These projects can take many different forms and have ranged from the public face of research and developer-funded programmes to projects run by museums, archaeological units, universities, and archaeological societies. Community archaeology also encapsulates those projects run by communities themselves or in dialogue between 'professional' and 'ama-teur' groups and individuals.

Many of these projects are driven by a desire for archaeology to meet a range of perceived educational and social values in bringing about knowledge and awareness of the past in the present. These are often claimed as successful outputs of community projects. This paper argues that appropriate criteria and methodologies for evaluating the effi cacy of these projects have yet to be designed.

What is community archaeology for? Who is it for? And is it effectively meeting its targets? Focusing on the authors' experiences of directing community archaeology projects, together with the ongoing research assessing the effi cacy of community archaeology projects in the UK, this paper aims to set out two possible methodologies: one of self-refl exivity, and one of ethno-archaeological analysis for evaluating what community archaeology actually does for communities themselves.

Public Archaeology , Medieval rural settlement , and Mortuary archaeology. Depicting the dead: Commemoration through cists, cairns and symbols in early medieval Britain more. The emotive force of early medieval mortuary practices more. Archaeologists have yet to fully appreciate the complex interactions between archaeological practice and contemporary responses towards death and commemoration in the UK. The paper reflects upon the experience of working with the local The paper reflects upon the experience of working with the local community during archaeological fieldwork in and around an English country churchyard at Stokenham in the South Hams district of Devon in southwest England during and Using this case study, it is argued that the current theories and parameters of both mortuary archaeology and public archaeology fail to adequately engage with the diverse community perceptions and concerns over mortality and commemoration.

At Stokenham, the archaeological research and student-training programme engaged local people in the discovery of their past but more importantly for the local community also helped to secure an acceptable commemorative future. It is argued that this provides a case study of how archaeological practice can interact with community attitudes to death and memory. Public Archaeology , Mortuary archaeology , and Churchyard monuments. More Info: Publication Name: Excapades. Keeping the dead at arm's length Memory, weaponry and early medieval mortuary technologies more. Archaeologists have identified two kinds of furnished graves dating to the late fifth and sixth centuries AD from southern and eastern England: inhumation and cremation.

While the 'weapon burial rite' is a frequent occurrence for While the 'weapon burial rite' is a frequent occurrence for inhumation graves, weapons are rarely found in cinerary urns. This article argues that this divergence may relate to the contrasting roles of cremation and inhumation as mortuary technologies of remembrance linked to alternative strategies for managing the powerful mnemonic agency of weapons. Rethinking Early Medieval Mortuary Archaeology more.

Early Medieval Archaeology and Mortuary archaeology. Archaeologists have identified the adoption of new forms of cremation ritual during the early Roman period in southeast Britain. Cremation may have been widely used by communities in the Iron Age, but the distinctive nature of these new Cremation may have been widely used by communities in the Iron Age, but the distinctive nature of these new rites was their frequent placing of the dead within, and associated with, ceramic vessels. This paper suggests an interpretation for the social meaning of these cremation burial rites that involved the burial of ashes with and within pots as a means of commemoration.

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In this light, the link between cremation and pottery in early Roman Britain can be seen as a means of promoting the selective remembering and forgetting of the dead. It is argued that recent archaeological theories of death and burial have tended to overlook the social and mnemonic agency of the dead body. Drawing upon anthropological, ethnographic and forensic analogies for the effects of fire on the As a case study in the archaeological study of the mnemonic agency of bodies and bones it is suggested that cremation and postcremation rites in the 5th and 6th centuries AD in eastern England operated as technologies of remembrance.

Cremation encouraged distinctive forms of engagement with the physicality and materiality of the dead. Material culture as memory more. This paper argues that mortuary practices can be understood as 'techno-logies of remembrance'. The frequent discovery of combs in early medieval cremation burials can be explained by their mnemonic significance in the post-cremation rite The frequent discovery of combs in early medieval cremation burials can be explained by their mnemonic significance in the post-cremation rite.

Combs and other objects used to maintain the body's surface in life served to articulate the reconstruction of the deceased's personhood in death through strategies of remembering and forgetting. This interpretation suggests new perspectives on the relationships between death, material culture and social memory in early medieval Europe.

How was the past perceived and created in early medieval Europe? Recent studies have discussed the dual roles of literacy and orality as ways by which the past was produced, reproduced and sometimes invented.

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Early medieval memory can be regarded as a social and ideological , rather than psychological, phenomenon. A wide range of studies have explored the roles and interactions between literacy and oral tradition in actively selecting and transforming the past in the light of contemporary socio-political needs.