Shelley among Others: The Play of the Intertext and the Idea of Language

Shelley Among Others The Play Of The Intertext And The Idea Of Language 2002
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The political dimension of Shelley's thought is grounded through often startling connections between his poems and the debates, events, and personalities of the time, and Peterfreund takes care to connect the theory of language which Shelley's work articulates with present-day literary theory, particularly in the writings of Lacan and Kristeva.

It is a book that will be especially important for Shelleyans and romanticists more generally. But the book will also be useful for advanced undergraduate and graduate students because of its comprehensive account of Shelley's writing. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? Read more Read less. Hogle Wordsworth Circle "The range of intertextual analysis alone will give this book a distinctive place in current Shelley studies.

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Buchanan, Carol , and Richard Buchanan. In other words intertextuality plays an important role in Gothic. I complained endlessly about the lack of linkage, and was told endlessly that if there were connections to be made, I should be making them by myself. Selected Poetry and Prose. Compulsory authors included Spenser and Milton, alongside Tasso and Ariosto, but no reference was ever made to the possibility that English writers might have been familiar with the Italians or vice versa. Shattock, Joanne , ed.

I'd like to read this book on Kindle Don't have a Kindle? No customer reviews. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. They also raise questions about authority and cultural transmission. Following the dynamic of these paired relations, the thought and ideals of the one figure is influenced and given form by the second, as its influence is extended onto the broader society.

The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley

Rousseau's encounter with the "shape all light" is less straightforward, in that it inspires a search to re-find her, "forever sought, forever lost," seemingly leading him toward transcendence, perhaps, and also into poetry. The encounter also initiates a process that ends in him joining the procession, or public life, a political life that eventually predominates over poetry. The example of Beatrice is more exclusively represented as a muse figure, without any hint of harmful influence, of course. Both the "shape" and Beatrice represent authority, and both initiate a process that, moving quickly, leads each writer into public life.

These latter two examples suggest an opposition between false guides and true guides, rather than between guided movement and abstention or withdrawal. The latter two examples initiate psychological movement, more than physical movement, and I'll turn now to the dialectic between psychic rigidity and movement that I think is central to the role of Rousseau in this poem.

Again, despite the poem's dark tone, many of its images of psychological movement suggest renewal or creativity. The narrator seems passive, in a trance, sitting by the wayside, but also participates actively, in a dialogue with Rousseau, and expresses emotions such as pity, grief, and wonder. They are thus both examples of cultural transmission--of the transmission of cultural energies from one source to another, in a manner that allows for distortion, but that can be also adapted to models of romantic creativity that valorize receptivity and the abandonment of habitual forms of selfhood.

Because the process of distortion, corruption, and disfigurement in this poem has been so well studied, I'll end with two points, drawing on Shelley's sources, that look in a different direction. First I'll quote a few lines from Dante, in order to show a successful example of cultural transmission and to examine the affect that accompanies it. When Dante meets Virgil in Canto One of the Inferno, Virgil identifies himself in a recognition scene that recalls the narrator's response to Rousseau's self-identification in the Triumph.

Dante's response to Virgil is as follows: "'Are you then, that Virgil, that fount which pours forth so broad a stream of speech,' I answered him, my brow covered with shame. Although Shelley's thinking about authority differs from Dante's in many ways, I think that the contrast between the introduction of the teachers, in this sense, is intentional, and signals something specific about Shelley's critique of Rousseau.

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In the Commedia, the teacher corrects Dante's behavior, but the affect arises internally. It is a social affect in this sense, but does not spread through mimesis or contagion. When the narrator meets Rousseau in the Triumph, the shame, conversely, is expressed by Rousseau himself, the teacher, who "vainly seeks to hide his eyes," as Dante hid his eyes when confronted by Beatrice, and expresses remorse for the errors that led him "to this deep scorn.

I don't insist on shame, but more generally on the copresence of desire along with an affect that limits desire and directs it. Rousseau, as here represented, hasn't assumed this pedagogical role, or internalized a principle of authority that would allow him to move beyond the role of student.

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His emotions only can communicate themselves mimetically, as the narrator mirrors his despair and contempt. I'll have to limit myself to a final point about Rousseau's encounter with the "shape all light," leaving out many details of the historical event in Rousseau's life that this passage represents. In this encounter, Rousseau is in the role of student, who asks questions and seeks experience, rather than in the role of teacher. The historical Rousseau received an inspiration, while travelling on foot to the nearby town of Vincennes, a vision that contained in condensed form the insights that would inform his major published works.

In Rousseau's text, the narrative including a dazzling vision of a "thousand lights" that recalls Saint Paul's conversion, and that Shelley would represent as the encounter with the "shape all light" that is the turning point of the narrative.

References

Shelley among Others: The Play of the Intertext and the Idea of Language. Article in Studies in romanticism 45(4) ยท January with 4 Reads. Ambitious in its scope, Shelley among Others: The Play of the Intertext and the Idea of Language is a comprehensive reading of Shelley's oeuvre through the.

Other elements of the historical event, such as Rousseau's reading of a passage chosen at random, rapid walking followed by shelter underneath a tree, sudden tears and other physical disturbances, recall Augustine's conversion and the literature of conversion narratives that it inspired.

Rousseau presents this narrative as an autobiographical event, but nonetheless it is saturated with cultural references that it does not openly acknowledge or discuss, or that he acknowledges only to reject.

The Complete Poetry of Percy Bysshe Shelley

Again, moving very quickly, I'll limit myself to noting Rousseau's refusal to open dialogue with this tradition and to the standing apart and forgetting that characterize his narrative as given in the Triumph. Rousseau's refusal of cultural mediation, which would be initiated by such a dialogue, strongly contrasts with the openly allusive Triumph of Life and is a very specific point of disagreement between the two writers that informs this portrayal in the Triumph. It points to a specific failing, a missed opportunity to initiate a process of cultural transmission such as is modeled by Dante and by other writers with whom the poem is in an open dialogue.

Dante Alighieri. The Divine Comedy. Charles S. Princeton, N.

Complete poetical works by Percy Bysshe Shelley Book editions published between and in 3 languages and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide. Shelley's critical prose by Percy Bysshe Shelley Book 5 editions published between and in English and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide. Il tramonto by Ottorino Respighi 15 editions published between and in Italian and Undetermined and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide. Shelley by Percy Bysshe Shelley Book 63 editions published between and in 6 languages and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide A pocket-sized anthology of poems by Romantic-era poet Percy Bysshe Shelley.

Prometheus unbound, a variorum edition by Percy Bysshe Shelley Book 6 editions published between and in English and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide. The Cenci : a tragedy in five acts by Percy Bysshe Shelley Book 47 editions published between and in English and Undetermined and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide A horrific tragedy, set in in Rome, of a young woman executed for pre-meditated murder of her tyrannical father. The poetical works of Shelley by Percy Bysshe Shelley Book 14 editions published between and in English and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide Selected pieces by one of the major English Romantic poets.

Often attacked for his "atheism" and "meliorism "revolutionism" to conservative minds. In truth, he was a deeply religious idealist committed to enlightenment, justice, and disinterested love. Political tracts of Wordsworth, Coleridge and Shelley by Reginald James White Book 18 editions published between and in English and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide. Audience Level. Related Identities. Associated Subjects.

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